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In North Dakota, a new partnership between the state’s Department of Corrections and a grassroots organization led by formerly incarcerated Chicano and Indigenous leaders, as well as the Vera Institute of Justice, plans to transform the prison system with one core principle: dignity.

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For Indigenous people in the U.S., food is considered a sacred gift. Healthy and bountiful produce is received when we care for the land.

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MONROE, Mich. — A yearlong effort to have a statue of Gen. George Armstrong Custer removed from downtown Monroe, Mich. has resulted in little action by the city officials in the small city 40 miles south of Detroit via I-75.

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RAPID CITY, S.D.— NDN Collective organized a demonstration on Sunday, July 4—the day colonists declared Independence from Britain in 1776—that resulted in the arrests of four people. Four people climbed a 100 foot tall mill and grain silo in downtown Rapid City, adorned it with an upside-down American flag with the words “Land Back” and were arrested for trespassing. 

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BILLINGS, Mont. — “Secretary Haaland, please return Endangered Species Act protections to the wolf,” is the closing message of a powerful new film, "Family," released today that ends with the stark warning, “Before it’s too late.” The Global Indigenous Council has released “Family” as a part of a campaign to restore federal protections to wolves across the continental United States.

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When green energy projects bloom across Washington, many are on cultural sites important to tribes in the region. The Yakama Nation’s director of natural resources feels torn about the increasing number of windmills and dams in his tribe’s ancestral territories. While Phil Rigdon (Yakama) supports the pursuit of greener energy sources, he has also been part of the tribe’s opposition to these developments when they negatively impact cultural sites. Their concerns are not often heard by developers.

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WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. — After the long months of the Covid-19 pandemic, Navajo Nation parks are allowed to reopen at 50 percent capacity. This comes as Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer signed a resolution into law on Tuesday, July 6, 2021.

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Each week Native News Online brings you the latest Indian Country news and moves from Washington, D.C. This past week, tribal leaders were excited to know that Indian Country is included in the bipartisan infrastructure deal. Additionally, two bills were introduced to address Native American health disparities and the BIA announced awards to 34 different tribes and Alaska Native corporations totaling over $6.5 million.

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Editor’s Note: This article was first published in the Smithsonian Magazine. Used with permission. All rights reserved.