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A survey commissioned by the by the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community, based in Prior, Minn., shows supermajorities in all demographic groups in the state of Minnesota support increasing education about tribes and Indigenous people in the state’s public schools.

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Guest Opinion. As an American Indian who grew up in a rural Indian economic slum before my tribe was federally recognized in 1972, we were extremely poor. The location of my tribal headquarters in Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan was one of the first three settlements in what is now the United States. Not federal recognized, my Tribe was subjected to engineered poverty. 

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In an effort to increase its enrollment of Native American students, the University of Minnesota on Monday announced an expansion of Native American student tuition support. 

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In a collaboration to assist descendants of Indian boarding school survivors, the American Indian College Fund and the National Native American Boarding School (NABS) Healing Coalition have joined forces to provide scholarships of $3,000 each to 20 recipients.

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RED LAKE, Minn.—On the morning of Monday, October 18, the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians hosted a groundbreaking ceremony for the tribe’s first charter school, Endazhi-Nitaawiging (The Place Where It Grows). The charter school is owned by the tribe, and its focus is to teach enhanced knowledge of Ojibwe language, culture, leadership and environmental stewardship. 

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The American Indian Graduate Center has announced the creation of the Miller Indigenous Economic Development Fellowship, a $190K program dedicated to Native research that was created with the support of Alumnus Robert J. Miller (Eastern Shawnee Tribe). The American Indian Graduate Center is one of the largest scholarship providers to Native Americans in the U.S. 

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The American Indian College Fund announced on Wednesday it has received a $5.3 million grant from the Bezos Family Foundation. According to a press release the grant will support the College Fund’s Indigenous Early Childhood Education program at tribal colleges and universities over the next four years.

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The Native American Media Alliance is accepting applications for the third annual Native American Virtual Animation Lab, to be held December 6-10, 2021. 

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PIERRE, S.D. — Facing bipartisan pressure and calls for her resignation by the South Dakota Education Equity Coalition, South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem told the state Department of Education to postpone controversial changes to its social studies standards for up to one year to allow for more public input.

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BISMARCK, N.D.— A mom and educator from North Dakota has released a children’s book aimed at answering why many Indigenous boys and men have long hair. Bear’s Braid, Native author Joelle Bearstail’s first book, was inspired by experiences her son had while attending school in Bismarck, N.D.