fbpx
 
Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False
Reader Survey Question: No Question

Just as easily as I found Lynn Hartman on my reporting trip to small-town Barre, Massachusetts last week, I could have missed her. I was traveling to Barre from New York City to report on a decades-long contentious issue between museum volunteers and South Dakota tribal members finally coming to a head. The crux of the story is this: The Barre Museum is said to have the largest collection of artifacts taken from the battlefield at Wounded Knee and later sold to a town resident. Those artifacts—including human hair, umbilical cords, scalps, and sacred objects—have remained on the top floor of the town’s library in their mostly-shuttered museum since 1892, when that Barre resident donated the artifacts to the museum. Though some Wounded Knee descendants asked for the artifacts back in the 90s, and then again at least once more in 2007, museum officials have said that disputed ownership claims have made it hard to know which entity to return the artifacts to.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False
Reader Survey Question: No Question

On January 19, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) reported that graffiti was discovered on property that it manages just west of Santa Fe along the Santa Fe River, the La Cieneguilla Petroglyphs. The Santa Fe New Mexican reported that some of the petroglyphs were defaced with a pentagram, a swastika and several racial slurs. According to the BLM, it was the third time the site had been vandalized in less than a year and the most damaging of the three incidents.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False
Reader Survey Question: No Question

LAWRENCE, Kan. — The University of Kansas’s First Nations Student Association (FNSA) hosted its 33rd annual powwow and 5th annual Indigenous Cultures Festival at the University's Lied Center on Saturday, April 9 to a crowd that numbered in the thousands. 

Type: Headshot
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False
Reader Survey Question: No Question

WASHINGTON — In addition to articles already covered by Native News Online, here is a roundup of other news released from Washington, D.C. that impacts Indian Country during the past week.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False
Reader Survey Question: No Question

Washington state will set up the nation's first statewide alert system for missing Indigenous people, under a law signed March 31 by Gov. Jay Inslee. But two things have caused some advocates to question how effective the law will be: It will be voluntary for law-enforcement agencies to issue alerts for people reported missing, and because some Indigenous communities lack Internet access and roadside infrastructure such as electronic highway signs, it will be difficult for people there to receive alerts. 

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False
Reader Survey Question: No Question

Senators Gary Peters (D-MI) and Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) recently introduced legislation that would name Baraga County Post Office after Cora Reynolds (Keweenaw Bay Indian Community), the first woman elected to the Michigan House of Representatives. She was a Republican.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False
Reader Survey Question: No Question

In a historic vote on Thursday, the U.S. Senate confirmed Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to become the first Black woman to become an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Jackson will assume the seat of retiring Associate Justice Stephen Beyers.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False
Reader Survey Question: No Question

The NDN Collective, an Indigenous-led organization based in Rapid City, S.D., was one of six winners of the 2022 Skoll Award for Social Innovation, announced Apr. 4 by the Skoll Foundation, a private foundation that invests in social entrepreneurs worldwide. This year’s awards went to six organizations working toward stronger health systems, racial justice, climate action, and inclusive economic growth in the U.S., Brazil, India, Bangladesh, and sub-Saharan Africa.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False
Reader Survey Question: No Question

French national Johannes Rivoire, age 93, a former priest in Canada’s residential school system, has been charged in Canada with sexual assault, that allegedly happened decades earlier.