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With the last day of Women’s History Month upon us, all are welcome to check out Women Win the Vote, the Centennial Gazette publication produced by the National Women’s History Alliance.

Native American women, who endured a long fight for voting rights in the United States, are covered on pages 7, 22 and 30. The full edition is available to read for free HERE. While non-Native American women won the right to vote in 1920, via the 19th Amendment, both Native women and men were not granted the right to vote in all 50 states until 1962—even after Native Americans had won U.S. citizenship in 1924, following The Indian Citizenship Act of 1924, also known as the Snyder Act. For further Women’s History Month reading, earlier this month, Biography published a nice breakdown of amazing women, check it out here: 5 Powerful and Influential Native American Women.

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Author: Danielle

August 03, 2021 Aaron Payment
Opinion. It is especially gratifying to see President Joe Biden lead in pushing to address the nation’s aging infrastructure with roads, bridges, water systems, schools, newer and greener energy platforms, public transit and high-speed rail, and much needed technology and broadband upgrades. President Biden’s and key members of Congress' announcement of a compromise deal for $1.2 trillion American Job’s Infrastructure plan will bring an additional $12 billion to Indian Country and a total appropriation to Indian County to historical levels to more than $44 billion dollars in the first year of this Administration and Congressional session.
Currents
August 03, 2021 Native News Online Staff Currents 299
WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. — Flags will be flown at half-staff on Navajo Nation this Wednesday in honor of World War II U.S. Army veteran and POW Thomas Lynch, Jr., who passed away on July 27, 2021. He was 98.
August 02, 2021 Charles Gerian, Blackwell Journal - Tribune Currents 645
Editor’s Note: This is the last story in a series of three about the past, present and future of the Chilocco Indian School that was originally published by Blackwell Journal – Tribune , a newspaper based in Blackwell, Okla. The Journal-Tribune worked closely with Chilocco alumni to present a story that is a respectful and honest representation of the men, women and history of the school itself.
August 01, 2021 Native News Online Staff Currents 822
WASHINGTON — Each week, Native News Online brings you the latest Indian Country news and moves from the nation’s capital. Janie Hipp (Chickasaw), who has worked tirelessly for several years on behalf of agriculture in Indian Country was confirmed by the U.S. Senate to serve as General Counsel of the USDA. The “Safeguard Tribal Objects of Patrimony Act of 2021,” an important bill that enhances protections over Native cultural artifacts, has been placed on the Senate calendar for consideration by the body. Read about other important policy items impacting Indian Country here.
August 01, 2021 Charles Gerian, Blackwell Journal - Tribune Currents 1541
Editor’s Note: This is the second story in a series of three about the past, present and future of the Chilocco Indian School that was originally published by Blackwell Journal – Tribune, a newspaper based in Blackwell, Okla. The Journal-Tribune worked closely with Chilocco alumni to present a story that is a respectful and honest representation of the men, women and history of the school itself.
Opinion
August 03, 2021 Aaron Payment Opinion 327
Opinion. It is especially gratifying to see President Joe Biden lead in pushing to address the nation’s aging infrastructure with roads, bridges, water systems, schools, newer and greener energy platforms, public transit and high-speed rail, and much needed technology and broadband upgrades. President Biden’s and key members of Congress' announcement of a compromise deal for $1.2 trillion American Job’s Infrastructure plan will bring an additional $12 billion to Indian Country and a total appropriation to Indian County to historical levels to more than $44 billion dollars in the first year of this Administration and Congressional session.
August 02, 2021 Chuck Hoskin Jr Opinion 441
For Cherokee families and businesses to thrive in the modern era, we must have well-maintained roads, clean water, fast internet connectivity, and access to great education and job training. Cherokee Nation knows the importance of both the “hard” infrastructure of steel and asphalt and the “soft” infrastructure of economic development and family supports. That’s why we have long been a strong leader and partner in building infrastructure to strengthen our region’s economy.
Sovereignty
July 28, 2021 Amanda Eggert, Montana Free Press Sovereignty 3687
More than 800 water rights claimed by members of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians have been pulled out of legal limbo following the Montana Water Court’s issuance of a first-of-its-kind order this month.
July 10, 2021 Darren Thompson Sovereignty 5124
PIERRE, S.D. — South Dakota Attorney General Jason Ravnsborg on Friday reversed his position on whether law enforcement should accept medical marijuana cards issued by the Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe (FSST) to non-tribal members. Ravnsborg's announcement doubles down on South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem stance that state non-tribal residents cannot legally buy medical cannabis with a tribal card, even if it required a physician’s sign off.
Education
July 23, 2021 Alex Sakariassen, Montana Free Press Education 1669
The lawsuit, filed on behalf of tribes, parents and students, alleges Montana education officials have failed to meet their constitutional mandate to provide Indian Education for All.
July 17, 2021 Native News Online Staff Education 6680
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. — The Cherokee Nation announced on Friday it is providing $150 in clothing assistance for every qualifying Cherokee student regardless of residency or income, with applications accepted beginning Tuesday, July 20.
Arts & Entertainment
July 30, 2021 Tamara Ikenberg Arts & Entertainment 840
This weekend and next week in Indian Country, the Indigenous animals and people of the Plains get their due at the zoo, Muscogee Nation hosts a hot premiere, and a boundlessly talented Tlingit weaver makes waves at a spirited art show.
July 29, 2021 Brangien Davis, Crosscut Arts & Entertainment 1555
Most of my art viewing is on purpose. I hear about something new or intriguing and seek it out. So it’s a joy for me to discover art where I’m not expecting it — art I know nothing about in advance. That happened last weekend when I took a road trip to Deception Pass State Park , which spans Fidalgo and Whidbey islands.
Health
Business
July 25, 2021 Levi Rickert Business 5423
LAS VEGAS — Actor Mark Wahlberg and his brother, chef Paul Wahlberg took center stage the National Indian Gaming Association's Indian Gaming Tradeshow and Convention in Las Vegas on Wednesday, July 21, to announce a newly formed partnership between their company, Wahlburgers Franchising and Little River Holdings, LLC, a wholly owned enterprise of the Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, based in Manistee, Mich.
July 19, 2021 Andrew Kennard Business 8458
It all started in a meeting in Las Vegas, where a couple of tribes expressed their concerns about managing the many operations involved with entering the cannabis industry to the Chief Executive Officers (CEO) of Violet Gro, Hyperponic, and Sunflower Consulting Group.