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The Unites States is a deeply divided nation, struggling to reconcile the legacies of its history. If that was ever in doubt, surely these last few months have exposed that stark truth, and this week’s election results made clear how far these rifts are from closing.

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Opinion. Ten days after Election Day, on Friday, the state of Arizona was called for President-elect Joe Biden by the major television networks. Even though the Associated Press and Fox News called Arizona for Biden after the polls closed on Election Day, it was conceivable the state could be won by President Donald Trump so the networks waited until they were convinced that it was not mathematically possible for the president to surpass Biden's lead.

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Opinion. Back in May, I talked to a Navajo woman, who gave her time as a volunteer to elderly Navajo citizens who were impacted by Covid-19. In addition to her full-time job with the federal government she volunteered her time to help get much needed supplies, such as water and other basic needs, to the Navajo elderly.

The Inter Tribal Council of Arizona
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OPINION. In the state of Arizona, American Indian people have fought a long political battle for the right to vote. It wasn’t until 1924 that the Indian Citizenship Act was passed and even though American Indians became citizens, they were still not eligible voters in Arizona. It took numerous lawsuits by American Indian citizens, Tribal leaders and Tribal Nations in Arizona before voting rights were won in July of 1948. Though the victory in 1948 was a milestone, American Indians are still facing obstacles and barriers getting to the polls and casting their vote.

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Opinion. Presidential elections are important because Americans get to decide the direction of the nation for the next four years. By now most Americans have made up their minds; hopefully, they were based on issues important to voters and not partisan loyalty.

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OPINION. What would grandma and grandpa do? Or better yet, ask yourself what have grandma and grandpa done for you?

James C. Ramos.
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OPINION. Native American voters are being courted as never before during this political season across the United States. In key swing states such as Arizona, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, North Carolina and Wisconsin, Indian people can play a significant role in determining who will lead the country, the future of federal health care and even flip party control of the U.S. Senate.

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Guest Opinion. Four hundred years ago, my ancestors were faced with a decision that indelibly shaped our world. In November of 1620 they chose to help the fledgling settlers of the Mayflower. They chose empathy over hate, mercy over revenge and inclusion over isolation. While the history that followed for our people was not just, the decision that they made was rooted in the values Native Americans continue to hold true. 

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Opinion. The 2020 election is being called the most consequential election of our lifetime. With voting already underway across the United States, forecasters are predicting more than 150 million Americans will vote in this election versus the 139 million who voted in the 2016 presidential election. If the forecasted number of voters cast their ballots, this election would be the highest voter-turnout percentage in over 100 years.

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When President Trump nominated Amy Coney Barrett to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) did an about-face on his past policy to deny consideration of Supreme Court nominees in an election year. As you may recall, McConnell refused to consider the nomination of Merrick Garland back in 2016 on the basis that the American people should be able to opine on the next Supreme Court justice through their vote. Sen. Thom Tillis (R-NC) agreed.