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Guest Opinion. From time immemorial, Cherokee people have shared stories to pass on our history and our values. The tools of storytelling have changed in the modern world, but the need to tell our stories is no less important. By growing the film and television industry within the Cherokee Nation Reservation, we can make sure our stories are seen and heard around the world. And we can be an important part of one of the most promising growth industries in Oklahoma.

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Guest Opinion. It’s been one year since President Biden reauthorized Executive Order 13175, which directed federal agencies to engage in consistent and meaningful Tribal consultation. This policy promised to be a tremendous step forward in securing Tribal sovereignty and achieving Indigenous representation in the decision making that impacts our ways of life, giving us a place at the table to prevent federal agencies from trampling on our culture. 

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I can’t think of a better metaphor for the need for respectful visibility of Native people in America than the Washington football team’s announcement that it changed its name to the Commanders—on Groundhog Day.

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The long and sad imprisonment of Leonard Peltier (Turtle Mountain Chippewa Nation) took on a new complication on Friday when it was reported he tested positive for COVID-19 while incarcerated at the United States Penitentiary at Coleman, Fla. (USP Coleman 1).

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Guest Opinion. For the second time in less than two years, the Supreme Court spoke clearly: The United States must keep its treaty promise to Cherokee Nation. Now, let us move forward.

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Guest Opinion. Beginning with the Indian Relocation Act of 1956, the federal government’s answer to the persistent poverty of Native Americans was to point to the lack of jobs in tribal communities and encourage their members to move to bigger, more prosperous cities in search of a better life.

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Guest Opinion: Every summer when I was growing up, I looked forward to the time I would spend with my family in Tularosa. A quiet oasis, these weeks were spent picking fruit from the trees in my grandparents’ yard and racing empty banana split boats through the irrigation ditches with my cousins. My grandfather, Demetrio “Dee” Herrera Montoya, served as mayor of Tularosa for many years. He passed away in 2010 after a battle with pancreatic cancer. He and my grandmother were children when the world’s first nuclear weapon was detonated on July 16, 1945, approximately 45 miles from their homes in the Tularosa Basin.

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Guest Opinion - Health. This past Thursday, I had the pleasure of attending an HHS Secretary Tribal Advisory meeting as a committee member to hear the announcement supporting Advanced Appropriations for Indian Health Services (IHS). At this meeting, we saw the culmination of our tribal leader efforts to secure both a Biden administration endorsement of Advanced Appropriations for the IHS as well as legislation in both the Senate (S.2985)1 and House (HR 5549, 5567) 2,3 to finally protect our treaty and trust obligation funding for health from federal government shutdowns.

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Tohono O’odham Nation Chairman Ned Norris, Jr., told the House Committee on Homeland Security Subcommittee on Border Security in February 2020 that the Trump administration’s Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was “giving little more than lip service to consultation.”

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Guest Opinion. In a health emergency, a few minutes can be the difference between life and death. Cherokee families deserve emergency responders who can always bring rapid care in a crisis. That’s why Deputy Chief Bryan Warner and I have proposed more than $54 million in funding to enhance Cherokee Nation’s Emergency Medical Services and upgrade our fleet of ambulances.