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 Guest Opinion. From individual Cherokee families to the whole Cherokee Nation, keeping children safe is our most essential responsibility. When parents go to work or school to build a better future for their family, the children need a secure, enriching environment to stay in. No parent or caregiver should have to choose between building that better future and accessing great care for their kids.

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Opinion. The day before last week’s White House Tribal Nation Summit kicked off, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) and the National Indian Health Board (NIHB) held a meeting with several dozen tribal leaders from across Indian Country at the Capital Hilton. They met to prepare for high-level discussions with high-ranking Biden administration officials that would take place at the summit. 

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Guest Opinion. Almost 200 years ago, the Treaty of New Echota between Cherokee Nation and the United States government was signed. Two years ago, I called on the U.S. to finally fulfill a commitment made in that treaty by seating a Cherokee Nation delegate in Congress, and I nominated Kim Teehee for the role. Last month, the U.S. House of Representatives finally held a historic hearing on this matter.

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OpinionOn Wednesday, I testified during the Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs hearing, “Native American Veterans: Ensuring Access to VA Health Care and Benefits.”
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Opinion. After a 187-year wait, the Cherokee Nation may be getting closer to having a delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives. 

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Editor’s Note: This commentary first appeared in the Los Angeles Times on November 23, 2017. Used with permission. All rights reserved.

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It was snowing lightly this past Tuesday in Michigan. It was the first snowfall during autumn. Because of the snow, I left several minutes for my trip to Kalamazoo from Grand Rapids for lunch with Billy Mills (Oglala Sioux Tribe) and his wife Pat.

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Guest Opinion. Cherokee language is core to our culture and our identity as a distinct people. Since European contact, the Cherokee people have been tested by wars, disease, broken treaties, forced removal, the suppression of our government, and the taking of our children away from their families to boarding schools where they could be severely punished just for speaking Cherokee.

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Opinion. This year November has proven busier than ever for all of us at Native News Online. From covering the slip of the tongue by a reporter who referred to Native Americans as “Indigenous creatures” to our in-depth coverage of Indigenous candidates in the midterm elections, our Native-led newsroom brought a Native perspective to the news. 

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Guest Opinion. At Cherokee Nation and across America, we recognize November as Diabetes Awareness Month. An estimated one in 10 Americans has diabetes. In Indian Country, the numbers are even higher, with more than one in six of the adult population affected. During Diabetes Awareness Month, we are making extra efforts to educate Cherokees about this serious disease.