Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False

Guest Opinion. One might not think of northwest Montana as the heart of the hostile climate policy inherited from the Trump administration. Keystone-XL and Standing Rock are well-known in the climate struggle’s pantheon, thanks to Indigenous people forming the frontlines in those struggles. But an unseen world, similarly vital, exists to the west, in the shadows of an ancient inland rainforest in the Yaak Valley of northwest Montana’s Kootenai National Forest (KNF). Once again, the Indigenous community is stepping-up to defend that, which if lost, will impact us all.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False

Opinion. Robert Aaron Long, a 21-year-old white man, on Tuesday walked into three Atlanta-area spas owned by Asian Americans and killed eight people in cold blood during his rampage. Six of the people killed were of Asian descent and two were white. Seven of those killed were women.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False

Guest Opinion. With the rollout of multiple vaccines and decreasing case numbers nationwide, it looks like we’re finally rounding a corner on the COVID-19 pandemic. As hopeful as this time is, it also allows us to refocus our attention on issues that have been overshadowed by the pandemic. In the shadows, the drug abuse epidemic has worsened dramatically: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that there were over 81,000 overdose deaths in the 12 months ending in May 2020, the highest number of overdose deaths ever recorded in a 12-month period.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False

This past week, as Democrats in Congress worked hard to pass the much needed American Rescue Package, a $1.9 trillion in coronavirus relief funds aimed at getting money in the pockets of Americans who continue to suffer from job losses and to vaccinate those who need it, some Republicans in Congress were talking about Dr. Seuss. 

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False

International Women’s Day is a time to look back over the previous year and reflect upon the positive strides that have been made, in Canada and around the world, in levelling the advantages distributed according to gender.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False

As Covid-19 began to spread across the United States, the first documented case in Indian Country was on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in Pendleton, Ore. on March 2, 2020. The tribes announced that day a staff member at the Wildhorse Resort & Casino tested positive for the coronavirus. The next day, the tribes announced their casino would be temporarily closed.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False

When a natural disaster occurs, our response can reveal our deepest values. The Cherokee Nation believes in “gadugi” – working together to better our tribe and for the greater good. Our talented workforce at Cherokee Nation and Cherokee Nation Businesses lived up to this value during the treacherous 2021 winter storm that hit our communities in February.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False

Guest Opinion. As Alaska Native women, we strongly support the historic nomination of Congresswoman Deb Haaland (Laguna Pueblo) to run the Department of the Interior. She would make long-overdue history as the first ever Indigenous cabinet secretary and we have weighed in with our Alaska Senators to encourage their support for her nomination. An article published by the Anchorage Daily News recently seemed to imply that there was widespread concern among Alaska Natives regarding Congresswoman Haaland’s nomination, but we find this misleading. We, the undersigned Alaska Native women, wish to speak proudly and boldly in support of the first Native woman cabinet secretary nominee.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False

Opinion. It was difficult to not get emotional as Rep. Deb Haaland testified at her confirmation hearing to become the 54th secretary of Dept. of the Interior before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee. The hearing that was held over two days and three rounds of questioning produced feelings of pride and disgust.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False

Opinion. Rep. Deb Haaland’s long-awaited confirmation hearing to become the 54th Secretary of the Department of the Interior is Tuesday morning.