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Opinion. Nick Saban’s Alabama Crimson Tide football team may be ranked number one in Division I College Football (SEC-West) going into tomorrow’s playoff game against the Cincinnati Bearcats, but if there was a ranking system for repatriation of Indigenous remains, the University of Alabama might be ranked at the bottom of the standings–in any conference. That’s because a repatriation fight between tribes and the university has gone on for over a decade with a lot of talk, but little action. 

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Guest Opinion: Soon after the Oklahoma Media Center (OMC) formed in 2020, the statewide news collaborative knew the Supreme Court tribal sovereignty case McGirt v. Oklahoma was an incredibly important topic. OMC collaborators were aware that nobody understood all the nuances of the evolving subject and also realized the landmark ruling had groundbreaking ramifications. Our participating news orgs thought they could cover the broad subject more comprehensively by aligning resources.

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Opinion. Editor’s Note: This commentary was originally published by Native News Online in December 2013. It has been updated to reflect 131 years that have passed since the tragic day.

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As we head into the final days of yet another unforgettable year, it’s important to take lessons from where we’ve been and consider the road ahead. For Indigenous peoples, this year has brought so much promise – and there is no turning back. 

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A Snapchat memory popped up on the open app. It was me wearing a Sáanii Up t-shirt, tortoise shell glasses, and my hair in a messy bun. A caption over my face reads, “Hoping I don’t have Covid.” It was a grim reminder that one year ago exactly my family and I caught Covid-19. I’ve never written about it before because I guess it was too hard and too traumatic. 

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Opinion. The end of the year brings an opportunity for reflection.

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Of the many vivid memories that stand out from my childhood in Mexico, the Christmas tradition of “pastorelas” are front and center. Pastorelas are nowadays two-act plays teaching the story of the birth of Christ through the eyes of humble shepherds. Back in the early years of the Spanish invasion of our lands, they were one-act performances meant to help Franciscan friars spread Christianity to the masses. 

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Guest Opinion. For generations, Native communities in the United States have faced a dire situation when it comes to infrastructure.

Gov. Kevin Stitt
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Republican Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt is an enigma. A successful businessman who began the Oklahoma-based mortgage company Gateway, he was elected governor in 2018. Stitt is an enrolled tribal citizen of the Cherokee Nation.

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Guest Opinion. In 2015, Cherokee Nation and the state of Oklahoma signed a historic compact on hunting and fishing licenses. For years, that agreement has been a win-win for Cherokee Nation citizens and for all Oklahomans. Cherokees living in Oklahoma received a license to hunt and fish across the state, and $32 million in new federal dollars went to the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.