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Opinion. Photographer Edward Curtis spent 30 years photographing American Indians. In 1904, Curtis published “The Vanishing Race,” considered his signature piece. It became the underlying reason for him to continue capturing photographs of American Indians before, in his mind, they became a people relegated to history.

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Cherokee military veterans have made great sacrifices to protect our tribal nation and the whole United States. None of our honored veterans should ever have to go without comfortable and safe housing. That’s why I’m excited about a joint project between the Cherokee Nation and the U.S. Department of Defense to build 21 new single-family homes specifically for veterans in our capital city of Tahlequah.

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Opinion. Late last month, one of Indian Country’s leading legal scholars, John Echohawk (Pawnee), addressed the Coalition of Large Tribes (COLT) on the topic of Native voting at its quarterly meeting in Las Vegas.

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For the past year, Cherokee Nation’s health care workers, first responders and other essential service providers for the health and well-being of our people have been taking heroic measures to treat and protect Cherokees during the global pandemic. Unfortunately, they are now facing a new crisis. Across the world and in our own backyard, we are witnessing a dramatic surge in Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations.

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Opinion. It is especially gratifying to see President Joe Biden lead in pushing to address the nation’s aging infrastructure with roads, bridges, water systems, schools, newer and greener energy platforms, public transit and high-speed rail, and much needed technology and broadband upgrades. President Biden’s and key members of Congress' announcement of a compromise deal for $1.2 trillion American Job’s Infrastructure plan will bring an additional $12 billion to Indian Country and a total appropriation to Indian County to historical levels to more than $44 billion dollars in the first year of this Administration and Congressional session.

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For Cherokee families and businesses to thrive in the modern era, we must have well-maintained roads, clean water, fast internet connectivity, and access to great education and job training. Cherokee Nation knows the importance of both the “hard” infrastructure of steel and asphalt and the “soft” infrastructure of economic development and family supports. That’s why we have long been a strong leader and partner in building infrastructure to strengthen our region’s economy.

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Last Tuesday, dozens of American Indians from Michigan tribes gathered on the shores of the Straits of Mackinac to see the “Red Road to DC” totem pole. It was the last official stop on its cross-country journey from the Lummi Nation, based in Bellingham, Wash. to Washington, D.C.

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When we say, “domestic violence is not traditional,” it is to remind Native Americans of a time before colonization. It’s a glimpse into a past when times were good. Instead, our memories only extend to the depths of colonization and the devastating impact it had on our people. Whether we know it or not, our words and actions reflect a story from the past.

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When news broke of the 215 bodies of Native American children found on the grounds of a former Canadian residential boarding school, my heart sank. It was like an earthquake shifting deep inside and causing a reverberation throughout my entire being. The historical trauma of the boarding school era hits deep, and while this particular school was in Canada, boarding schools throughout North America were highly detrimental, generationally damaging and wholly destructive to Native American tribes.

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As I was leaving Las Vegas Friday after a week covering the National Center for American Indian Economic Development’s Reservation Economic Summit (RES) and the National Indian Gaming Association's Indian Gaming Tradeshow and Convention, I was greeted with a nice email with positive news that the Cleveland Major League Baseball team is changing its name from the “Indians” to the “Guardians.”