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Guest Opinion. Systemic racism comes in many forms, and one way it is popularly seen is in undignified, mass-produced Halloween Indian costumes. This blatant disregard for Indigenous peoples and their (very different) cultures is disrespectful and offensive.

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October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month

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Opinion. Let me give you a teaser from our just-completed, soon-to-be-released midterm elections poll conducted by Native News Online. It comes from a question asked about democracy: 615 out of 678 of our readers–that’s 91%–answered yes to the question: “Do you think American democracy is under threat?”

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Guest Opinion. In the modern world, high-speed internet access has become an essential utility, just like water, gas and electricity. All those living on the Cherokee Nation Reservation need the ability to participate in the digital economy. Many Americans now take for granted services like telehealth, remote work and access to the vast amount of information and resources for learning and communication online. Unfortunately, broadband access on tribal reservations has badly lagged behind the rest of the country.

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Guest Opinion. I’m in a unique position to write this: I’m a former tribal leader with a federal Indian policy background. I had the privilege of calling former Cherokee Principal Chief Wilma Mankiller a friend. I also count as a friend, Kim Teehee, the Cherokee Nation’s delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives pursuant to an 1835 treaty the Cherokee signed with the U.S. government. 

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Opinion. Friday’s release by the Albuquerque FBI Division of its updated list of missing Indigenous persons in New Mexico and the Navajo Nation is a reflection of progress to obtain accurate information relating to those who are missing in Indian Country. 

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Guest Opinion. As we draw near to election day, I urge you to begin making your plans to participate. I encourage all Cherokees to vote, either by going to the polls on November 8 or by voting early or absentee. This election is one of the most important elections that we have faced as Native Americans in the state of Oklahoma. This year every congressional and statewide office is on the ballot, as well as hundreds of important state legislative and local races.

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Guest Opinion. The week started with Indigenous Peoples Day and ends with a subpoena of former President Trump. In between came an exodus from the Los Angeles City Council over racist rhetoric. We turn to URL Media partners to make sense of these intersections. 

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Guest Opinion. Monday marks Indigenous Peoples’ Day, thanks to the tireless work of Indigenous advocates and allies who have worked to secure its recognition by municipalities, states, and the nation (although still not a federal holiday, Indigenous Peoples’ Day is a federally recognized holiday). Native Peoples were always here—at the time of contact—and now, thanks to the tenacity and resilience of our ancestors and the advocacy of our people today. When we celebrate Native heritage, cultures, traditions, and people today, we remember our ancestors’ many sacrifices and soberly reflect on the impact colonialism had on our people and our ways of living.

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Guest Opinion. Indigenous Peoples’ Day is a call to higher consciousness, and it is one that is not solely defined by human beings, but emerges from the original instructions of what the Lakota people also call wotakuye (relations with all life).