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While tough challenges are nothing new for Native Americans, nearly two years of COVID-19 have been brutal. Federal figures show the massive harm this pandemic has inflicted on us. COVID has hit Native American communities harder than any other community in the U.S. We have more than three times the hospitalization rate and more than twice the death rate as non-Native communities.

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Guest Opinion. Every year in November, Americans either knowingly or unknowingly celebrate settler colonialism, by gathering friends and family members of all ages to perpetuate a false narrative. Indigenous peoples have always been ignored when we have voiced our truth on the fourth Thursday in November. 

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During a conversation last month, Tunica-Biloxi Tribe of Louisiana Chairman Marshall Pierite asked if I knew Indian Country was having a “moment” with the Biden administration.

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Today on Veterans Day, we honor the men and women who have served in the United States Armed Forces. Commemorated annually, Veterans Day originated as “Armistice Day” on November 11, 1919, the first anniversary of the end of World War I. Then President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed legislation in 1954 that changed the name to Veterans Day. It is a national holiday that honors all veterans—alive and dead—who have served the United States in the military. 

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At the United Nations Climate Conference (COP26) in Glasgow, the buzzy phrase of choice is “net zero.” The idea is that countries and companies will ensure that any greenhouse gases they send into the atmosphere are matched by an equal amount of greenhouse gases they arrange to remove from circulation.

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Guest Opinion. November is when the United States celebrates Native American Heritage Month. At Cherokee Nation, we will certainly spend this month celebrating our heritage and culture with the rest of the country. We are also putting our thoughts into historic action.

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When he proclaimed November Native American Heritage Month, President Joe Biden became the sixth U.S. president to recognize the month as such since President George Herbert Walker Bush in 1990. 

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Guest Opinion. With the House of Representatives’ vote just before midnight to approve President’s Biden’s infrastructure bill, it is important to recognize the threshold moment of the new $15 billion bi-partisan appropriations for tribal infrastructure in the $1.2 trillion bill.

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Opinion. With the Atlanta Braves in this year’s baseball World Series, conversations this past week about the team's appropriation of Native American imagery and culture have extended beyond the green playing field of Truist Park, where the team plays their home games.

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Guest Opinion. Protecting women and children from violence within the Cherokee Nation Reservation is a deeply personal cause for First Lady January Hoskin and me. Likewise, the Cherokee Nation tribal government has a solemn duty to protect safety and ensure justice across our 14-county reservation.