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Opinion. Citing treaties that date back to 1849 and 1868, the Navajo Nation on Monday morning will argue in the U.S. Supreme Court that it should be granted access to water from the Colorado River. 

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Guest Opinion. The Cherokee people are deeply connected to the land and historic locations across our reservation in northeast Oklahoma. Decades before statehood, Cherokees built the first schools, courthouses, modern roads and more in this place. The historic sites on our reservation are a testament to the resilience of the Cherokee people, who built thriving new communities from scratch after our removal on the Trail of Tears.

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Opinion. Each year, the president of the United States submits an annual budget to Congress for consideration for the upcoming fiscal year, which begins on October 1. The budget submission is the beginning of a process that involves a long series of negotiations in both chambers of Congress between Democrats and Republicans. 

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Guest Opinion. One of the greatest accomplishments of Cherokee Nation has been building the largest health care system in Indian Country. Our world-class facilities receive more than 1.5 million patient visits each year, and we have strategically built health facilities around our 7,000-square-mile reservation so that no Cherokee on the reservation is more than 30 minutes away from care.

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Guest Opinion. For my people, the Salish, when the Mission Valley on the Flathead Reservation is first blanketed with snow, a new cultural season is underway. Traditionally, winter ushers in a time when we tell our stories and reflect on our histories, weaving in life lessons to remind us of where we’ve been and who we want to be as a people, as a Native nation.   

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Guest Opinion. We at the Lakota People’s Law Project mourn the loss of a good and important man this past week. Retired South Dakota United States Senator James Abourezk, the architect of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), passed away in Sioux Falls on Friday, Feb. 24 on his 92nd birthday. Throughout his long life, Sen. Abourezk was a tireless champion of the rights of the Indigenous Peoples of North America, and throughout the decades, I was fortunate to work alongside him. Since 2005, he chaired Lakota Law’s Advisory Committee, and we will miss him greatly.

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Opinion. Several decades ago I was an executive director of an urban Indian center in my hometown of Grand Rapids, Michigan. During that time I developed a friendship with an Odawa elder. Our friendship became meaningful because he shared with me his life’s story growing up in his tribal lands in northern Michigan. 

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Guest Opinion. Today, I share with you the story of my experience on the ground during that monumental moment. I’ll talk about the way things unfolded and how those weeks under siege were the first domino in a series of events that catapulted our movement into the international spotlight — and also eventually led to the formation of the Lakota People’s Law Project.

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Opinion. Monday marks the 50th anniversary of the takeover of Wounded Knee on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation on February 27, 1973 by the American Indian Movement (AIM). 

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Guest Opinion. Cherokee Nation is trusted with dollars to provide services for our citizens, and we take that responsibility extremely seriously. Essential services like housing, health care, elder support and economic development depend on it. Whether our funding comes from tax revenue, federal grants and set-asides, or business profits, we track each dollar carefully to do the most good for Cherokees. The best financial decisions are made with transparency and accountability.