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Opinion.  About thirty years ago, I made a deal with myself to read at least one book a year written by a conservative right-winger so that I could try to understand the rationale behind their positions on race relations and governmental policy. As the years flew by and the United States became extremely polarized, I stopped reading conservative writings because I found many of their arguments lacked merit and were, quite often, mean-spirited and laced with paternalistic attitudes towards people of color.

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Guest Opinion. Oklahoma is quickly emerging as one of the most desirable states for filmmaking. The Oklahoma Department of Commerce has stated that film and TV is a core industry for the state and will be a boon for communities and small businesses.

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Opinion. Jim Thorpe, a citizen of the Sac and Fox Nation, is an iconic hero among Native Americans. He was a dominant college athlete, a medal-winning Olympian and a Hall-of-Fame professional football player. He also played professional baseball and basketball, for good measure.

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Guest Opinion. Dwight Birdwell is an American hero and Cherokee Nation patriot. I deeply respect the man for his service to our tribal nation and to our country. Now he is the most recent recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor, the United States’ most prestigious award for military veterans who showed bravery in combat at the risk of life, above and beyond the call of duty.

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Opinion. Thirty some years ago, I attended a family function. As more of the family assembled for dinner I casually asked two of my mother’s cousins why we didn’t know a whole lot about our family history. It seemed to me that our elders should have passed it down so that I would be able to pass it on to my children and grandchildren. 

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Guest Opinion. Political division. Competing governing factions. Revenge killings.

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Editor’s Note: This commentary was published in observance of the Fourth of July holiday in 2015. Native News Online is republishing it again this year. 

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Opinion. Centuries ago, the federal government used the U.S. Cavalry to strip us Native people of our lands, massacring us on horseback riding through the Great Plains.

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Guest Opinion. The United States Supreme Court’s disconcerting decision in Oklahoma v. Castro-Huerta will go down in history as a ruling against legal precedent and the basic principles of federal Indian law. Tragically, it is another broken promise from the federal government to tribes. A narrow 5-4 majority of the Supreme Court has ignored its sacred responsibility to uphold the law when it comes to federal treaties with Native sovereign nations.

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Guest Opinion. The United States Supreme Court’s history and jurisprudence is rooted in a colonial violence, Indigenous land dispossession, genocide, and slavery, but we are still surprised when, in 2022, it determines a woman no longer has a Constitutional right to bodily autonomy. Why? I turned this question inward and now share my thoughts as an Indigenous woman, as a lawyer in the field of federal Indian law, and as someone who has an interest in seeing this country turn from its violent colonial origins toward mutually beneficial governance practices rooted in trust.