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Today, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) announced the formation of a new branch within its organization: the NCAI Sovereignty Institute, aimed at enhancing and supporting tribal governance in Indian Country.

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Today the Monacan Indian Nation in what is today Virginia announced that the ancient burial ground containing dozens of their ancestors is no longer at risk for development, after years of back-and-forth with a water authority who wanted to build a pipeline through the land.

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On Wednesday, the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians became the first ever tribe to receive government approval for the creation of a Tribal Energy Development Organization (TEDO). The Department of the Interior’s Office for the Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs’ approval of the Red Lake Band’s TEDO will support the Minnesota tribe’s ongoing effort to develop renewable energy resources. 

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The United States might be held accountable for the death of an Ute Indian Tribal citizen on his reservation in northeast Utah nearly 15 years ago, after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in February reversed a dismissal of the case.

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Yesterday, U.S. District Judge Lawrence Kahn wrote in a summary judgment ruling that New York State’s purchase of the Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe’s (SRMT) reservation lands in the 1800s violated the federal Non-Intercourse Act. The lands purchased by the state are known as the “Hogansburg Triangle” and is in the center of the reservation reserved for use by SRMT tribal members in a 1796 Treaty, which was ratified by U.S. Congress on May 31, 1796. 

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The White House wants to ​​to increase protection of and access to Indigenous sacred sites.

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In order to secure the return of 58 stolen skulls of Native Hawaiian ancestors from museums in Europe last month, an Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) delegation appealed to museum employees’ humanity.

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MILLE LACS INDIAN RESERVATION — On Friday, U.S. District Judge Susan Richard Nelson wrote a 93-page opinion on Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe v. County of Mille Lacs affirming that the boundaries of reservation were never dissolved, confirming the Tribe’s sovereignty on its lands. The Tribe filed a federal lawsuit in 2017 arguing that the (Mille Lacs) county prevented the Mille Lacs Tribal Police from policing within the reservation boundaries. 

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The Chinese Embassy in Washington D.C. has released a statement titled, “The American Genocide of the Indians—Historical Facts and Real Evidence,” in the “news” section of its website. The statement identifies the definition of “genocide” and goes on to state that, “According to international law and its domestic law, what the United States did to the Indians covers all the acts that define genocide and indisputably constitutes genocide.”

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The Grand River Bands of Ottawa Indians, a Tribe in the state of Michigan, has been trying to gain federal recognition for nearly three decades. On Thursday, the 600-member tribe took another step toward advancing the process.