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OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla. —  U.S. Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland (Laguna Pueblo) and Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Indian Affairs Bryan Newland (Bay Mills Indian Community) will visit the Riverside Indian School in Anadarko, Okla. on Saturday, July 9, 2022 at 10 a.m.

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In 1853, the ancestors of the Port Gamble S'Klallam Tribe watched the ship Julius Pringle arrive at their shores in present-day Washington state. The ship carried Captain William Tabot of the namesake Pope & Talbot Company, who continued the process of displacement and land degradation that lasted all the way until relatively recently, when the ancestors of the company's founders began working with the ancestors of those people watching along the shore to return control of some of the land back to the tribe. 

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After a precedent-setting summer of rulings, this fall the U.S. Supreme Court will hear four cases that could overturn the federal Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), and have bigger implications for tribal sovereignty and Native American communities.

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NEW YORK—In early June, the New York state legislature passed legislation that, if signed by Gov. Kathy Hochul, would protect unmarked burial sites from excavation.

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Two issues were on the table during the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs’ hearing June 22: the Department of the Interior’s landmark investigative report on Indian Boarding Schools, and legislation intended to work in tandem with the department’s initiative to address trauma and bring healing to boarding-school survivors and their communities.

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On June 18, the remains of 13-year-old Wade Ayers were set to go home to  the Catawba Nation in South Carolina for the first time since he was sent to the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania in 1901. But at the disinterment ceremony, U.S. Army archaeologists excavating under Wade’s headstone found remains inconsistent with those of a 13-year-old boy, which were “instead found to be that of a girl of the approximate age of 15-20.”

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The long-lost pipe-tomahawk that belonged to Chief Standing Bear was finally returned home to the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska on June 3. 

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Twenty years after they first spotted the name of a relative on a tombstone at one of the nation’s most infamous Indian Boarding Schools, two Catawba Nation tribal members are preparing to finally bring him home.

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On May 31, a Hawaiian housing advocacy group filed a lawsuit in federal district court in Honolulu against the Bank of America, demanding almost $850 million for the total direct and indirect losses from a loan commitment the bank failed to fulfill to Native Hawaiians in the 1990s.

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On Monday, June 13, the Supreme Court ruled in Denezpi vs. United States 6-3 that a Navajo man’s double-jeopardy rights were not violated by the federal court after he was first prosecuted and sentenced by the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe in Utah for a violent sexual offense against another citizen of the Navajo Nation.