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The White House wants to ​​to increase protection of and access to Indigenous sacred sites.

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In order to secure the return of 58 stolen skulls of Native Hawaiian ancestors from museums in Europe last month, an Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) delegation appealed to museum employees’ humanity.

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MILLE LACS INDIAN RESERVATION — On Friday, U.S. District Judge Susan Richard Nelson wrote a 93-page opinion on Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe v. County of Mille Lacs affirming that the boundaries of reservation were never dissolved, confirming the Tribe’s sovereignty on its lands. The Tribe filed a federal lawsuit in 2017 arguing that the (Mille Lacs) county prevented the Mille Lacs Tribal Police from policing within the reservation boundaries. 

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The Chinese Embassy in Washington D.C. has released a statement titled, “The American Genocide of the Indians—Historical Facts and Real Evidence,” in the “news” section of its website. The statement identifies the definition of “genocide” and goes on to state that, “According to international law and its domestic law, what the United States did to the Indians covers all the acts that define genocide and indisputably constitutes genocide.”

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The Grand River Bands of Ottawa Indians, a Tribe in the state of Michigan, has been trying to gain federal recognition for nearly three decades. On Thursday, the 600-member tribe took another step toward advancing the process.

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Another First Nation has found Indigenous children's graves on the grounds of a former Residential School.

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This Day in History – Feb. 27, 1973

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When two Oyate boys, Edward Upright (Spirit Lake Nation) and Amos LaFromboise (Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate), left their homes in the Dakotas in 1879, they were 13 and 12 years old, respectively. They were each the son of a powerful tribal leader—Amos of Joseph LaFromboise, a founding father of his tribe, and Edward of Chief Waanatan—in line to become hereditary chiefs of their respective tribes when they grew older. Instead, they never left the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania: They both died before they turned 16, and remain buried in the cemetery beside the former school grounds.

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NEW YORK — More than 200 academics, artists and allies have signed onto a petition to stop New York City’s infamous Theodore Roosevelt statue from being relocated from a storage facility to the ancestral homeland of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara (MHA) people in North Dakota.

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Beginning today, the Supreme Court of the United States will hear two oral arguments in cases both calling into question tribal sovereignty.