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The Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, or Ojibwe, as they call themselves, has been reckoning with its government boarding school for decades. The school was one of many strewn across North America that used abuse and intimidation to purge Indigenous culture and language out of Native American youth. The Lac du Flambeau have since wrestled with what to do with the old building and how to heal the community. Now, their historians and educators are working to restore and strengthen cultural ties for future generations. 

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First Nation leaders and residential school survivors are in Rome, Italy, this week to ask Pope Francis for an apology for the Catholic Church’s more than 100-year role in operating Indian Residential Schools for Indigneous youth in Canada.

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NEW YORK—The Myth of Manhattan goes like this: Dutch settlers, arriving in 1626 on the island called Manahatta by its Lenape residents, believed they struck a deal with the Natives. For $24 worth of beads and trinkets, the Dutch believed they “purchased” the island, and soon built walls on the southern tip of the island—now Wall Street—to keep them out.

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After 12 hours of testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday night, Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, the first Black woman nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court, was questioned by Sen. Alex Padilla (D-CA) on voting rights and tribal sovereignty. 

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For Penobscot Nation ambassador Maulian Dana, the Violence Against Women Act reauthorization signed into law by President Joseph Biden March 16 is personal.

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Today, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) announced the formation of a new branch within its organization: the NCAI Sovereignty Institute, aimed at enhancing and supporting tribal governance in Indian Country.

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Today the Monacan Indian Nation in what is today Virginia announced that the ancient burial ground containing dozens of their ancestors is no longer at risk for development, after years of back-and-forth with a water authority who wanted to build a pipeline through the land.

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On Wednesday, the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians became the first ever tribe to receive government approval for the creation of a Tribal Energy Development Organization (TEDO). The Department of the Interior’s Office for the Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs’ approval of the Red Lake Band’s TEDO will support the Minnesota tribe’s ongoing effort to develop renewable energy resources. 

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The United States might be held accountable for the death of an Ute Indian Tribal citizen on his reservation in northeast Utah nearly 15 years ago, after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in February reversed a dismissal of the case.

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Yesterday, U.S. District Judge Lawrence Kahn wrote in a summary judgment ruling that New York State’s purchase of the Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe’s (SRMT) reservation lands in the 1800s violated the federal Non-Intercourse Act. The lands purchased by the state are known as the “Hogansburg Triangle” and is in the center of the reservation reserved for use by SRMT tribal members in a 1796 Treaty, which was ratified by U.S. Congress on May 31, 1796.