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Native innovators in the United States are invited to submit proposals to the MIT Solve Indingeous Communities Fellowship, an initiative of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology aimed at driving innovation to solve world challenges and benefit Native communities. Winning proposals selected will each receive a $10,000 grant.

“The pandemic not only created new challenges in tribal communities, as it did around the world, but it also exacerbated existing inequities ranging from health services to schooling, infrastructure, and beyond,” the fellowship overview reads. “In addition to unbroken generations of tribal leadership, there is still a great need for continued innovation and the revitalization of traditional practices to heal and strengthen communities.”

For four years, the MIT Solve has launched open calls for applications from Indigenous innovators specifically. The first year focused on Oceti Sakowin; the second expanded to include the Navajo Nation and Hopi Tribes; and the third and fourth year have invited all American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiians to apply.

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This year, eight technology-based proposals will be accepted that are aimed at supporting culturally-grounded educational opportunities; mental or physical health programming; climate resilience; and supporting entrepenurialship in Indian Country. 

Interested participants can apply online here by Mar 31, 2022. To learn more about how to apply, here are tips and tutorials.

 

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About The Author
Jenna Kunze
Author: Jenna KunzeEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Senior Reporter
Jenna Kunze is a staff reporter covering Indian health, the environment and breaking news for Native News Online. She is also the lead reporter on stories related to Indian boarding schools and repatriation. Her bylines have appeared in The Arctic Sounder, High Country News, Indian Country Today, Tribal Business News, Smithsonian Magazine, Elle and Anchorage Daily News. Kunze is based in New York.