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Bacone College (Courtesy photo).

MUSKOGEE, Okla. — Bacone College announced it appointed Aaron Adson, a Bacone alumnus, as its new director of the Center for American Indians.

Aaron Adson, Director, Bacone College Center for American Indians. (Courtesy photo)

Adson is an enrolled member of the Comanche Nation who also represents the Pawnee and Dine' (Navajo) nations. He was born and raised in Pawnee, Okla. and is a member of the Native American Church. Adson earned his business degree with an emphasis in American Indian leadership from Bacone College in 2019.

“I feel thankful and honored for the opportunity to be the next Director of the Center for American Indians here at Bacone College,” Adson said. “First and foremost, I believe Native American culture begins in the home. Our intent and goal at Bacone is to provide a culturally aware environment that allows students to feel comfortable while studying away from home.

“Whether you come from a cultural background or are seeking cultural understanding while here at Bacone, we will provide a center of academics, recreation and spirituality that any of our students can relate to," he said.

To learn more about Bacone College and its cultural and spiritual opportunities for students, please visit www.bacone.edu/future-students for a virtual tour, a cultural and spiritual video presentation by Adson, and a presentation on its historic art program.

 

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