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The American Indian College Fund has earned a Four-Star Rating from Charity Navigator for its strong financial health and vitality, which includes its ongoing accountability and transparency 

This rating designates the College Fund as an official “Give with Confidence” charity, which indicates it is using its donations effectively based on Charity Navigator’s criteria. 

Charity Navigator is America’s largest and most-utilized independent charity evaluator. Since 2001, the organization has been an unbiased and trusted source of information for more than 11 million donors annually.

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Charity Navigator analyzes nonprofit performance based on four key indicators, referred to as beacons. Currently, nonprofits can earn scores for the Impact and Results, Accountability and Finance, Culture and Community, and Leadership and Adaptability beacons.

“We are delighted to provide the American Indian College Fund with third-party accreditation that validates their operational excellence,” said Michael Thatcher, President and CEO of Charity Navigator. “The Four-Star Rating is the highest possible rating an organization can achieve. We are eager to see the good work that the College Fund is able to accomplish in the years ahead.”

“Our Four-Star Charity Navigator is further validation that our supporters can trust our commitment to good governance and financial health,” said Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund. “We hope this rating will introduce our work to new supporters while also reinforcing to our current supporters that we are committed both to our mission to create greater access to a higher education for Native students sustainably and transparently.”

The American Indian College Fund’s rating and other information about charitable giving are available free of charge on charitynavigator.org.

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