fbpx
 

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. — As you get into the habit of writing the new year on a legal document, including your personal checks, you should write out "2020" completely. Many are used to simply only using the two last digits of the year to legal documents, such a "12/31/19."

This year's abbreviation is too easily changable for some unscrupulous person and could leave you vulnerable to fraud. For instance, a scammer could easily change a document you dated for "1/23/20" to "1/23/2021."

Only using the last two digits of the year could cost you a lot, law enforcement and other experts say.

"Say you agreed to make payments beginning on '1/15/20.' The bad guy could theoretically establish that you began owing your obligation on '1/15/2019,' and try to collect additional $$$," Ira Rheingold, executive director of the National Association of Consumer Advocates, told USA Today via an email earlier this week.

While most people are honest and would never think to alter a check or other legal document, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure." Writing out "2020" entirely may save you in the end.

 

 

 

 

 

 

More Stories Like This

American Basketball Association Announces Native ABA Initiative
Four Winds South Bend Upgrades to Class III Gaming Casino
Native News Online Wins Two Awards from Native American Journalists Association
Wahlberg Brothers Are a Big Hit at Indian Gaming Tradeshow and Convention in Las Vegas
Native Gro Offers Tribes a ‘One-Stop Shop’ for Entering the Cannabis Industry

Do you appreciate a Native perspective on the news? 

For the past decade-plus, we’ve covered the important Indigenous stories that are often overlooked by other media. From the protests at Standing Rock and the toppling of colonizer statues during the racial equity protests, to the ongoing epidemic of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW) and the past-due reckoning related to assimilation, cultural genocide and Indian Boarding Schools, we have been there to provide a Native perspective and elevate Native voices.

Our news is free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts. Any contribution — big or small — helps us remain a force for change in Indian Country and continue telling the stories that are so often ignored, erased or overlooked.  Most often, our donors make a one-time gift of $20 or more, while many choose to make a recurring monthly donation of $5 or $10.  Whatever you can do, it helps fund our Indigenous-led newsroom and our ability to cover Native news. 

Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Levi Rickert
Author: Levi RickertEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Levi Rickert (Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation) is the founder, publisher and editor of Native News Online. Rickert was awarded Best Column 2021 Native Media Award for the print/online category by the Native American Journalists Association. He serves on the advisory board of the Multicultural Media Correspondents Association. He can be reached at [email protected]