fbpx
 

LAKEWOOD, Colo. — The Bureau of Indian Affairs is seeking grant proposals to identify, evaluate and assess the market for tribal energy or mineral development projects. 

The Bureau is offering funding for the projects via the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development’s Division of Energy and Mineral Development (DEMD). 

DEMD expects to fund 25 to 30 projects ranging from $10,000 to $2.5 million, according to a notice in the Federal Register. The scope of the projects can only last for one year at a time. 

The Energy and Mineral Development Program grants are intended to fund “Tribes and Tribal Energy Development Organizations for technical assistance funding to hire consultants to identify, evaluate or assess the market for energy or mineral resources that a Tribe will process, use, or develop,” according to the notice. 

Tribes can use the funding for initial resource exploration, defining potential targets for development, performing market analysis to establish production/demand for a commodity, performing economic evaluation and analysis of the resource, developing baseline studies related to energy and mineral projects, and various other pre-development studies required for energy and mineral resources development. 

The resources could include “biomass (woody and waste) for heat or electricity; transportation fuels; hydroelectric, solar, or wind generation; geothermal heating or electricity production; district heating; other forms of distributed energy generation; oil, natural gas, geothermal, and helium; sand and gravel, coal, precious minerals, and base minerals,” according to the request for proposals. 

Eligible projects must take place on Indian lands or land conveyed to an Alaska Native Corporation. The feasibility studies funded by the grants can be completed by tribal energy development organizations, colleges and universities, private consulting firms, or nonprofits.

Ineligible uses are projects not occurring on Indian lands, establishing or operating tribal offices, salaries for most tribal employees, purchasing equipment, drilling wells for the commercial sale of resources, legal fees, permitting application fees, and training activities, among others.  

Projects will be weighed by their economic viability, project viability, budget and the scope of work and deliverables, among other factors, according to the notice

DEMD began accepting proposals for the competitive grant program on Sept. 3. Applications must be submitted no later than Dec. 2.

More Stories Like This

TESTTESTTEST
Gun Lake Casino Raises Minimum Starting Wage to $14 Per Hour
A Prayer Answered: SpaceX to Expand Internet Coverage in Rural Alaska With FCC Approval
‘Ever Sick Dangles’: Indigenous Apparel Brand Celebrates First Nations Hockey
Tribal Broadband as a Cyber Superhighway to Sovereignty

While you're here...

We launched Native News Online with the belief that everyone in Indian Country deserves equal access to news and commentary pertaining to them, their relatives and their communities. That's why the story you’ve just finished was free — and we want to keep it that way, for all readers. We hope it inspires you to make a gift to Native News Online so that we can continue publishing more stories that make a difference to Native people, whether they live on or off the reservation. Your donation will help us keep producing quality journalism and elevating Indigenous voices. Typically, readers donate $20, but any contribution of any amount — big or small — gives us a better, stronger future and allows us to remain a force for change. Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you.

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online Staff