fbpx
 
Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False
Reader Survey Question: No Question

During a conversation last month, Tunica-Biloxi Tribe of Louisiana Chairman Marshall Pierite asked if I knew Indian Country was having a “moment” with the Biden administration.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False
Reader Survey Question: No Question

At the United Nations Climate Conference (COP26) in Glasgow, the buzzy phrase of choice is “net zero.” The idea is that countries and companies will ensure that any greenhouse gases they send into the atmosphere are matched by an equal amount of greenhouse gases they arrange to remove from circulation.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False
Reader Survey Question: No Question

Guest Opinion. November is when the United States celebrates Native American Heritage Month. At Cherokee Nation, we will certainly spend this month celebrating our heritage and culture with the rest of the country. We are also putting our thoughts into historic action.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False
Reader Survey Question: No Question

When he proclaimed November Native American Heritage Month, President Joe Biden became the sixth U.S. president to recognize the month as such since President George Herbert Walker Bush in 1990. 

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False
Reader Survey Question: No Question

Guest Opinion. With the House of Representatives’ vote just before midnight to approve President’s Biden’s infrastructure bill, it is important to recognize the threshold moment of the new $15 billion bi-partisan appropriations for tribal infrastructure in the $1.2 trillion bill.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False
Reader Survey Question: No Question

Opinion. With the Atlanta Braves in this year’s baseball World Series, conversations this past week about the team's appropriation of Native American imagery and culture have extended beyond the green playing field of Truist Park, where the team plays their home games.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False
Reader Survey Question: No Question

Guest Opinion. Protecting women and children from violence within the Cherokee Nation Reservation is a deeply personal cause for First Lady January Hoskin and me. Likewise, the Cherokee Nation tribal government has a solemn duty to protect safety and ensure justice across our 14-county reservation.

Type: Headshot
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False
Reader Survey Question: No Question

On Thursday morning, I woke up to messages from friends who sent me the Instagram video of the teacher “dressed” as a Native American who was going viral on social media. The video was of a Riverside, California’s John W. North High School math teacher who was filmed by a Native American student as the teacher pranced around her classroom in an attempt to, dance, sing and pray as a Native American. 

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False
Reader Survey Question: No Question

Guest Opinion. The most powerful thing that the Cherokee Nation can do for our citizens is to give them a platform to achieve their own dreams. My administration is committed to helping all Cherokees reach their full potential, including my making the largest investment in career training programs in Cherokee history.

Type: Default
Ad Visibility: Show Article Ads
Hide Blurb: No
Hide More Stories Like This: False
Reader Survey Question: No Question

Guest Opinion. Not very long ago, Native Americans were hard to find in the film industry. Even when a Native character appeared on screen, they were often portrayed by actors who did not come from Native communities. With some notable exceptions, Native writers, directors and other creative talent were even more rare. Stories were told about us, but they weren’t our stories.