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The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., the great civil rights icon, fought hard for the right to vote for all Americans. He did so in the deep South where Jim Crow laws made it impossible for Blacks to exercise their rights to vote. 

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Guest Opinion. Today our nation pauses to honor the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Since his birthday was first observed as a holiday in 1986, communities across the land have found meaningful ways to honor his work and ideas – through volunteerism, activism, and reflection. Certainly, Dr. King worked tirelessly in his commitment to peace, equality, and justice and his name is often invoked as a symbol of all these ideas, to the betterment of our shared society. But, too often, symbols become idealized, romanticized, or even redefined, for purposes that lie beyond their intent.

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Opinion. As Americans celebrate Martin Luther King Day on Monday, across America, many tribal, federal, state and local governments will be closed to honor the legacy of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Guest Opinion The discussion on affirmative action usually involves workplaces or higher education, but never housing. Why not? In Hawaiʻi, there is a century-old land and housing program for native Hawaiians, arguably one of the nation’s longest running affirmative action programs. Despite the lack of national attention this program has received, it offers a hundred years of lessons for any new effort that a city, state or federal government might design to counteract historic and ongoing racial discrimination.

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Opinion. It was a blustery Monday in North Dakota during the first week of December in 2016. Strong Great Plains winds pushed my body down the hill from the highway back into the Oceti Sakowin Camp at Standing Rock. Around noon, after covering a march with hundreds of veterans, word spread through the camp that highways were closed and everyone there had to stay until the blizzard ended. Frustration came over me because there was no internet and I could not post stories to Native News Online. I thought the rest of the day would be wasted.

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What some are calling the fifth surge since the pandemic began almost two years ago, the Omicron variant is causing an unprecedented spike in COVID-19 cases and causing a severe strain on hospital capacity across the country. On Friday, NBC News reported COVID cases were up 204 percent as compared to the two prior weeks.

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Guest Opinion. Cherokee Nation citizens will soon have better access to world-class health care. I recently signed legislation that will invest $440 million into major health care capital improvements. This commitment will ensure our people get the kind of quality health care they deserve for many years ahead.

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Opinion. On Monday, tribes across Indian Country commemorated Indigenous Peoples’ Day from Alcatraz Island to New York City and throughout hundreds of tribal communities in between. The commemorations and celebrations featured singing, dancing and speeches laced with truths recognizing the struggles Indigenous people face today. 

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Guest Opinion. “It took a long time to realize, but I don’t think that my daughter is with us today,” Loxie Loring responded when asked by Dr. Phil where she thought her daughter was. The recent episode of his highest-rated talk show exposed a national TV audience to the Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) crisis. Loxie’s daughter, Ashley Loring Heavy Runner, was last seen alive on the Blackfeet Nation in Montana on June 5, 2017. I was sat next to Loxie on the set, and she gripped my hand as she made that heart-wrenching admission.

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Opinion. Nick Saban’s Alabama Crimson Tide football team may be ranked number one in Division I College Football (SEC-West) going into tomorrow’s playoff game against the Cincinnati Bearcats, but if there was a ranking system for repatriation of Indigenous remains, the University of Alabama might be ranked at the bottom of the standings–in any conference. That’s because a repatriation fight between tribes and the university has gone on for over a decade with a lot of talk, but little action.