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Native students from anywhere in the United States can now attend Portland State University (PSU) for the same price as in-state students. 

Previously, out-of-state Native students did not qualify for the in-state tuition prices. Now, out-of-state Natives who are enrolled in a federally recognized tribe can get their tuition rates decreased. All the student needs to prove this status is their enrollment card, or a letter from their tribe’s enrollment office. 

Out-of-state tuition for PSU is about $29,000 as of 2019-20. The discount for these newly qualified students is about $420 per credit hour, or $19,000 an academic year for 15 credit hours a semester. Although this discount is not fully-free tuition, it is still a major step in the right direction in increasing equity in higher institutions for Native students. 

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"Portland State offers this benefit to tribal members as part of our ongoing effort to provide a welcoming environment for Indigenous students in downtown Portland," Chuck Knepfle, PSU's vice president of enrollment management, said in an announcement about the new program. "This offer of in-state tuition is a small way to honor the legacy of Indigenous nations from across the country."

For Natives who are members of one of the federally recognized tribes in Oregon, PSU is offering a new grant to cover any college-related costs for the 2022-23 academic year. There are also other scholarships and support programs for PSU Native students that are offered through the Native American Student and Community Center. 

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About The Author
Neely Bardwell
Author: Neely BardwellEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Neely Bardwell (descendant of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indian) is a staff reporter for Native News Online. Bardwell is also a student at Michigan State University where she is majoring in policy and minoring in Native American studies.