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The University of Kansas William Allen White Journalism School has launched a Native Storytelling Workshop for high school students, in partnership with the Native American Journalists Association (NAJA) and Haskell Indian Nations University. This workshop will take place June 12-16, 2022 at the University of Kansas campus in Lawrence. 

Native high school students from across the country are encouraged to apply. If chosen, the students will get to visit the KU campus for four days. Students who attend will receive a room and all meals for the duration of the workshop. Scholarships will be available for those who may need assistance with travel costs to and from Lawrence, KS. 

While there, students will have opportunities to experience the field of journalism by learning about the basics of online and digital news content creation, podcasting, and multimedia journalism. 

KU Journalism professors Dr. Melissa Greene-Blye (Miami Tribe of Oklahoma), and Professor Rebekka Schlichting (Ioway Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska) will be leading the workshop. Joining them is Jared Nally (Miami Tribe of Oklahoma), an award-winning former Editor-in-Chief of Haskell’s The Indian Leader. 

Interested students can apply here.

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About The Author
Neely Bardwell
Author: Neely BardwellEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Neely Bardwell (descendant of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indian) is a staff reporter for Native News Online. Bardwell is also a student at Michigan State University where she is majoring in policy and minoring in Native American studies.