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TAHLEQUAH, Okla. — The Cherokee Nation announced on Friday it is providing $150 in clothing assistance for every qualifying Cherokee student regardless of residency or income, with applications accepted beginning Tuesday, July 20.

The Cherokee Nation clothing assistance program was established to help Cherokee families in purchasing new clothes for the upcoming school year.

Cherokee Nation Human Services will accept applications for the school clothing assistance program until Aug. 20, 2021 through the tribe’s online Gadugi Portal at https://gadugiportal.cherokee.org.

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 “Deputy Chief Bryan Warner and I both understand how important it is to provide clothing assistance to our Cherokee students and I am excited that for the second year in a row, we are able to extend this assistance to all Cherokee students, regardless of their residency or family income,” Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr said. “We know the clothing assistance program will help ease the burden of back-to-school costs so many families face each year.”

The only qualification is students must be enrolled Cherokee Nation citizens as of July 16, 2021. Students must be 5-18 years old during the application period or must be enrolled in kindergarten through 12th grade or an equivalent school program. Students can be in public, private, virtual or home-school programs. Post-secondary education students do not qualify for this program.

Applications for the assistance program must be complete when submitted on the Gadugi Portal. Processing of applications containing incomplete or incorrect information may be delayed, and applicants may be contacted after the deadline for additional documentation or clarification.

Clothing assistance payments may be made electronically or by paper check after the application has been verified. Details about dates for payment processing will be forthcoming.

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