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Despite the show initially getting renewed for a second season, “Stumptown” has been abruptly canceled by ABC. The cast and crew were reportedly contacted this morning about the cancellation of the show, originally set to premiere this fall.


On the bright side, word is, the show’s producers are already shopping the show to other outlets.

While it’s unclear what exactly caused ABC to axe the hit series, according to Deadline, a timing issue prohibited the show from filming on time and being ready for the projected launch date. Beyond that, the high-end drama starring Cobie Smulders and Native film legend Tantoo Cardinal, “was among the most expensive second-year broadcast TV scripted series.” It also reported that due to the many stunts, various filming locations and romance scenes, the show was hit with many COVID-19 restrictions.

Back in February, in an exclusive interview with Native News Online, Cardinal reflected on her decades-long career as an Indigenous woman working in Hollywood. The Alberta native said she often had to fight for equitable treatment throughout her career, but noted the entertainment industry’s inclusion of Native people has vastly improved over the years.

“Now, we have our own filmmakers who are stepping forward and telling their own stories — our story,” Cardinal told Native News Online. “When I first started, we didn’t have that, not anyone I knew about.” 

When asked about her preference for acting roles, Cardinal said she looks at the big picture.

“I prefer good stories,” she said. “Strong characters and forward movement in what we’re doing, in terms of breaking down and shaking loose this big barrier that’s there in front of Indigenous people — in all of our disciplines and all of our careers.”

Native News Online will post an update if and when the show gets picked up by a new network.

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