OKLAHOMA CITY — The non-profit producer of the award-winning Red Earth Festival is calling for applications for the Red Earth Emerging Artist Award. 

The annual award provides funding to emerging Native American artists, allowing them to participate in Oklahoma City’s annual Red Earth Festival.

Red Earth Inc., which produces the festival, recently announced the event is moving from the Cox Convention Center in downtown Oklahoma City to the Event Center at the Grand Casino Hotel & Resort. The new location is tribally owned and just minutes east of downtown on I-40.

The award is presented for the 34th annual Red Earth Festival, scheduled June 13-14, at The Event Center at the Grand Casino Hotel & Resort in Shawnee. 

The Emerging Artist Award provides booth space at the Festival Art Market, an opportunity to compete in the Red Earth Festival art competition and $150 for expenses. Deadline to apply for consideration is April 10.

Past recipients have included Amber DeBoise (Navajo) and Kaitlyn Tingle (Choctaw) in 2018, and Steven Morales (Cherokee) in 2019, according to a news release. 

To qualify, applicants must be a U.S. citizen, at least 19 years of age and be able to provide proof of tribal membership in a federal or state-recognized tribal entity. Applicants are not required to be enrolled in a school or fine arts program.

Applicants must fill out an Artist Application, provide three to five images of artwork, submit a one-page resume of art education, experience and achievements, and an artist background.

Visit www.RedEarth.org or call (405) 427-5228 for additional information.

Support Independent Indigenous Journalism

Native News Online is an independent, Indigenous-led newsroom with a crucial mission:  We want to change the narrative about Indian Country. We do this by producing intelligent, fact-based journalism that tells the full story from all corners of Indian Country.  We pride ourselves on covering the tribes you may have never heard of before and by respecting and listening to the communities we serve through our reporting. As newsrooms across the country continue to shrink, coverage of Indian Country is more important than ever, and we are committed to filling this ever-present hole in journalism.

Because we believe everyone in Indian Country deserves equal access to news and commentary pertaining to them, their relatives and their communities, the story you’ve just finished was free — and we want to keep it that way, for all readers. But we hope it inspires you to make a gift to Native News Online so that we can continue publishing more stories that make a difference to Native people, whether they live on or off the reservation. Your donation will help us keep producing quality journalism and elevating Indigenous voices. Any contribution of any amount, big or small, gives us a better, stronger future and allows us to remain a force for change. 
Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you.

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online Staff