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Richmond, VA—On Friday November 19, the Pocahontas Reframed Storytellers Film Festival began its fifth year of festivities with both a live and virtual film festival highlighting Indigenous voices, stories, filmmakers, producers, and writers. The festival was hosted at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.

“We’re excited to welcome guests back to the film festival after a two year hiatus, due to the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Pocahontas Reframed Storytellers Film Festival President Brad Brown to Native News Online. “This year, our virtual film festival is set to showcase films for an entire week for those who can’t make it to Richmond.” 

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The festival includes 25 Native American-affiliated classic and recently released films that have been official selections of world-renowned film festivals including Sundance Film Festival, the American Indian Film Festival San Francisco, and the Toronto International Film Festival. In addition, the festival hosts panel discussions featuring writers, producers, and directors. 

Each year the festival hosts a film student to give them an opportunity to meet other filmmakers and share their film with a live audience. If chosen, the festival awards the student with a $1,000 scholarship to continue with their studies. This year’s recipient is Suni Sonqo Vizcarra Wood (Quechan and Pueblo) for the short film, “Yaku, The Water Spirit,” which was the winner of a Tribal College Journal’s student writing award. Vizcarra Wood is a visual arts student at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA). 

“It’s an honor to be here, to be among so many dedicated filmmakers,” said Suni Sonqo Vizcarra Wood to Native News Online. “I’m excited to be a part of such a great event that features Indigenous voices.” His film is an homage to his Indigenous culture, land, and heritage. 

The Pocahontas Reframed Storytellers Film Festival aims to raise awareness about Native American language, cultures, and societies through films that share Native American perspectives. Unique in its location, the Pocahontas Reframed Film Festival offers new insight into previously under-told narratives. 

CLICK HERE to learn more about the Pocahontas Reframed Storytellers Film Festival. The festival continues through Sunday, November 21, 2021.

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About The Author
Author: Darren ThompsonEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Darren Thompson (Lac du Flambeau Ojibwe) is a staff reporter for Native News Online who is based in the Twin Cities of Minnesota. Thompson has reported on political unrest, tribal sovereignty, and Indigenous issues for the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, Indian Country Today, Native News Online, Powwows.com and Unicorn Riot. He has contributed to the New York Times, the Washington Post, and Voice of America on various Indigenous issues in international conversation. He has a bachelor’s degree in Criminology & Law Studies from Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.