fbpx
facebook app symbol  twitter  linkedin  instagram 1
 

Kevin Gover, the longtime director at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, will enter into a new role at the institute this week as the new Under Secretary for Museums and Culture. 

Gover, a member of the Pawnee Tribe of Oklahoma, has served as acting director for his new role since February.

The Under Secretary for Museums and Culture oversees the Smithsonian’s history and art museums, its cultural centers, and the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Exhibits and the National Collections Program.

Gover was hired as director of the National Museum of the American Indian in 2007. Prior to that, he practiced law, eventually teaching within the Indian Legal Program at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University.

From 1997 to 2000, Gover served as the Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs in the U.S. Department of the Interior. He made history on the 175th anniversary of the BIA when he formally apologized for the agency’s devastating impacts to Native Americans. 

Particularly noteworthy during his tenure at the National Museum of the American Indian: Gover oversaw exhibits, such as “Americans,” which looked at Native Americans’ influence on present day identity of the nation; he initiated the National Native American Veterans Memorial through a commission from Congress; he helped launch Native Knowledge 360°, a national educational initiative that provides schools with more accurate and comprehensive Native American history materials.

Acting director Machel Monenerkit will continue to fill Gover’s role at the National Museum of the American Indian. Monenerkit has been working for the museum since 1994.

More Stories Like This

Tunica-Biloxi Tribe of Louisiana Celebrating Its 26th Annual Powwow
Here's What's Going On In Indian Country, May 17th —May 23rd
Q&A: Diné Designer and Entrepreneur Amy Denet Deal on Being Honored by CNN
Forge Project Awards $150,000 to Native American Artists
Q&A: Ojibwe Designer Lucie Skjefte on New Collaboration with Minnetonka Footwear

These stories must be heard.

This May, we are highlighting our coverage of Indian boarding schools and their generational impact on Native families and Native communities. Giving survivors of boarding schools and their descendants the opportunity to share their stories is an important step toward healing — not just because they are speaking, but because they are being heard. Their stories must be heard. Help our efforts to make sure Native stories and Native voices are heard in 2024. Please consider a recurring donation to help fund our ongoing coverage of Indian boarding schools. Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous-centered journalism. Thank you.

About The Author
Jenna Kunze
Author: Jenna KunzeEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Senior Reporter
Jenna Kunze is a staff reporter covering Indian health, the environment and breaking news for Native News Online. She is also the lead reporter on stories related to Indian boarding schools and repatriation. Her bylines have appeared in The Arctic Sounder, High Country News, Indian Country Today, Tribal Business News, Smithsonian Magazine, Elle and Anchorage Daily News. Kunze is based in New York.