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ROCKVILLE, Md. — The Indian Health Service (IHS) announced it has approved the Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine for adolescents who are 12 and above and said the vaccination is available at IHS facilities throughout Indian Country. 

The IHS views this next wave of vaccinations as important so that Native youth can return to social activities safely and provides parents and caregivers peace of mind knowing their children are protected from the Covid-19 virus. 

IHS says it has ample supply of the Pfizer vaccine and are working with IHS Area Offices and federal, tribal and urban sites to distribute the vaccine.  

All IHS sites throughout Indian Country are encouraged to run patient panels message to parents and patients, schedule clinics to accommodate school schedules, and coordinate with pediatric providers and staff.

IHS is also encouraging federal, tribal, and urban sites to think about incorporating family vaccination clinics into Covid-19 vaccine activities, where all members of a family can get up to date on any vaccines that are due. If an adolescent is behind on routinely recommended vaccines due to the pandemic or for other reasons, now would be a good time to work with them to make sure they get caught up.

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The truth about Indian Boarding Schools

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