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Lorelei Cloud felt the thrum of the propeller as she leaned back to look out the window of the small plane, flying over the Southern Ute Reservation and southwest Colorado. The rivers that sustain agriculture, ecosystems, and millions of people stretched out before her. She saw signs of long-term drought–low water in the Vallecito Reservoir, which the tribe depends on for irrigation. She also got a clear view of a logistical problem she works to solve as a member of the Southern Ute Tribal Council and the Water and Tribes Initiative.

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On Tuesday, the White House released a Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Tribal Playbook to help tribal governments understand how to access the more than $13 billion set aside in the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law for Indian Country.

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When Theresa Dardar, a member of the Pointe au Chien Indian Tribe, first caught wind of Hurricane Ida's trajectory towards coastal Louisiana, she planned to stay with her brother's family in Houma, Louisiana to wait out the storm. But as she kept watching the news, she started to think that maybe Houma — a city 30 miles from the coast — wasn't far enough.

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The Department of the Interior today announced a $29 million investment in dam safety programs for tribal communities.

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As two combined wildfires flare across New Mexico, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Deputy Administrator Erik Hooks met with the state’s emergency management and tribal leaders to discuss wildfire response and ongoing recovery efforts.  

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Climate change continues to impact all of us, yet most climate adaptation planning tools fail to address the needs, cultures, perspectives, or values of Indigenous and Tribal communities. 

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It’s the final full day of the Society of Environmental Journalists 2022 Conference, and this morning I am having breakfast with the folks from the Uproot Project, a network for environmental journalists of color.

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Alaska’s sea ice is melting, and that’s hurting ringed and bearded seal populations along the western coast. To try to help these seal populations, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has issued new restrictions on commercial activity in the Bering Sea. Those in favor of the new restrictions say that NOAA is doing what it can to protect these animals. Those opposed think that it’s unnecessary federal overreach that will prevent commercial industries from operating effectively.

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Today we are hosting a panel discussion at the Society of Environmental Journalists 2022 Conference: Covering Indian Country for Non-Natives. 

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“Certain times of year, the water is brown,” Corey Hinton, Passamaquoddy, told Native News Online. He’s describing his tribe’s drinking water that comes from nearby Boyden Stream Reservoir, fed by a lake that’s often used for recreational purposes, and as a dumping ground for waterfowl.