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The Department of the Interior today invited tribes to begin consulting on how best to implement the infrastructure bill that includes at least $13 billion for Native communities to improve roads, expand broadband access, and fund sanitation, water rights, and environmental reclamation projects.

“The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law is an unprecedented investment in Indian Country that will ensure that future generations have clean air, drinkable water, fertile soil and an overall quality of life that is currently threatened by the worsening climate crisis,” Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland said in a statement. “Tribal leaders know best the needs of their people. It is critical that Tribes continue to be at the decision-making table as we implement this historic opportunity.”

The department sent letters to each tribal nation today, asking them to “offer input and provide feedback” on early planning decision for programs within the bill on Jan. 26-28. Those programs include:

  • Tribal Climate Resilience programs;
  • Water infrastructure and drought resilience programs;
  • Indian water right settlement investments;
  • Wildfire resilience programs;
  • Ecosystem restoration programs;
  • Legacy pollution programs; and
  • U.S. Geological Survey infrastructure law programs.

Tribes can additionally submit written comments to [email protected] by Feb. 4.

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