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Boise State University (BSU) announced last week a new Native American scholarship for tribal citizens of the five federally recognized tribes in Idaho: Shoshone-Bannock, Nez Perce, Shoshone-Paiute, Kootenai, and Coeur d’Alene Tribes.

The university provided the following statement, “BSU is committed to increasing educational access to all populations, including Native American students. The University has entered into a Memorandum of Agreement with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes with a commitment to work to maintain a tuition and fee model that increases access and opportunities for the Tribes as domestic sovereign entities.

As part of this commitment, members of Idaho’s five federally-recognized Native American tribes may be eligible for the Boise State University Native American Scholarship. This Scholarship recognizes the unique sovereign states of members of Idaho’s five federally-recognized Native American tribes.”

The scholarship reduces the cost per credit for both undergraduate and graduate students.This is a significant drop in tuition costs for higher education students. For undergraduate students, the regular cost per credit is $380.45; now it is $60/per credit.  For Graduate students, their reduction is even more, with $491 per credit hour; now it is also $60 per credit hour. 

To be eligible students must be degree-seeking and eligible to enroll in Boise State courses. This Scholarship is for tuition only, and other institutional, program and/or class fees still apply. 

For more information, go online at:  https://www.boisestate.edu/scholarships/native-american-scholarship/

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