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In this week’s Tribal Business News Round-Up, Wells Fargo releases a report on how the lack of data affects investor interest in Indian Country, Native Hawaiian groups place culture at the center of tourism, and marginalized farmers sue the USDA over unfulfilled funds. 

Lack of data stymies investor interest in ‘invisible’ tribal economies, Wells Fargo report finds

Private investment in Native businesses and tribal economies largely centers on one resource: data. That’s according to Dawson Her Many Horses, head of Native American finance at Wells Fargo, who notes that longstanding accessibility issues and a fragmented financial landscape have created “invisible economies” on tribal reservations. 

Hawaiian tourism shifts Native culture to forefront

Hi’ipaka LLC plans to focus on Native Hawaiian culture in the renovation and expansion of a significant cultural site and popular tourist attraction on the island of Oahu. 

Marginalized farmers sue USDA over broken promises for debt relief 

Leaders of Native- and Black-led farmer organizations have filed a joint class action lawsuit on behalf of any “socially disadvantaged” farmer who filed for USDA debt relief included as part of the American Rescue Plan Act, a program that was later repealed. The filing came just as the

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USDA announced that it has issued $800M in relief to distressed borrowers while opening comment for discrimination relief. 

Additionally, find out details of Native CDFI Network’s partnership with one of the nation’s largest banks to expand banking services to Native-owned businesses and learn about Indigenous cannabis industry leaders’ advice to tribal leaders and entrepreneurs during a discussion at Indigenous Biz Con.

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