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The Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina has been pushing for federal recognition more than 100 years. During the last year’s presidential election, both major candidates supported the Lumbee Tribe’s effort for federal recognition.

On Wednesday, the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs will receive testimony on S.1364, the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina Recognition Act. If enacted, the Act would grant federal recognition to the Lumbee Tribe on North Carolina and would make its tribal citizen eligible for the services and benefits provided to members of federally recognized tribes. Lumbee tribal citizens residing in Robeson, Cumberland, Hoke, and Scotland counties in North Carolina are deemed to be within the delivery area for such services.\

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The bill was introduced by Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC) on April 26, 2021.

In addition to the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina Recognition Act, the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs will hear testimony on  H.R.1975, the Pala Band of Mission Indians Land Transfer Act of 2021H.R.2088, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Historic Lands Reacquisition Act, and H.R.4881, the Old Pascua Community Land Acquisition Act.

WHEN: Wednesday, November 17, 2021, 2:30 p.m. – Eastern Time

WHAT: Sen. Brian Schatz (D-HI) to lead Senate Committee on Indian Affairs Legislative Hearing.

WITNESSES:

  • The Honorable Bryan Newland, Assistant Secretary-Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior, Washington, DC
  • The Honorable Harvey Goodwin, Jr., Chairman, Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina, Pembroke, N.C.
  • The Honorable Robert Smith, Chairman, Pala Band of Mission Indians, Pala, Calif.
  • The Honorable Richard Sneed, Principal Chief, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, Cherokee, N.C.
  • The Honorable Peter Yucupicio, Chairman, Pascua Yaqui Tribe, Tucson, Ariz.

HOW TO JOIN: Access the live stream here.

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