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ISABELLA INDIAN RESERVATION — The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan will host a “Virtual Honoring, Healing & Remembering” event to commemorate the 87th anniversary of the closing of the Mt. Pleasant Industrial Boarding School on Friday, June 4, 2021 from 10 a.m. – 12 noon – EDT.

This event will be a virtual event. To join the event, visit: http://www.sagchip.org/miibs

Honoring, Healing and Remembering is typically held on the grounds of the closed boarding school, but because of the Covid-19 pandemic the event is being held virtually.

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The Virtual Honoring, Healing & Remembering event recognizes the suffering, strength and resilience of approximately 225 students that perished while attending the Mt. Pleasant Indian Industrial Boarding School.

“As the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan prepares for its Virtual Honoring, Healing & Remembering event. we are painfully awakened again to the shameful legacy of the American Indian Boarding School and the Canadian Indian Residential School era,” the Tribe said in a news release.

“The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan stands united in solemn respect with the Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc community of British Columbia, Canada as they mourn 215 individuals discovered on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School. A fitting tribute to these beautiful children will be offered as part of the Virtual Honoring, Healing & Remembering event,” the press release continued.

Mt. Pleasant Indian Industrial Boarding School. c. 1910

The Mt. Pleasant Indian Industrial Boarding School was established by an act of Congress, compelling Indian children to be removed from the care of their families to attend residential schools. The Mt. Pleasant Indian School operated from Jan. 3, 1893 until June 6, 1934, with an average enrollment of 300 students annually. 

The Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan now owns the property of the closed boarding school.

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