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TUSHKAHOMA, Okla. — Thousands of Choctaw tribal citizens are Tushkahoma, Oklahoma (Tvshka Homma), the Choctaw Nation's capitol grounds for the annual Labor Day Festival that lasts all weekend long. The Choctaw Nation Labor Day Festival has been a decades-long tradition for the Choctaw people who gather to celebrate their culture and meet up with family and friends.

The annual gatheing on Labor Day weekend began with an opportunity to listen to the Chief speak and conduct tribal business. One of the earliest instances of the festival’s origin was a letter documenting interest in the first Choctaw Princess being selected in 1969. In its beginning, the gatherings were small compared to today where the festival includes carnival rides, softball, and, of course, stickball.

Choctaw women played stickball, as well Friday night. (Photo/Darren Thompson)

In additonal to the sports events, the annual Choctaw Nation Royalty pageant was held on Friday evening. Winners inclused: Senior Miss Aliyah Myers from District 7, Junior Miss Kassidy Lee from District 9, and Little Miss Sophia McFarland from District 11.

Senior Miss Aliyah Myers from District 7, Junior Miss Kassidy Lee from District 9, and Little Miss Sophia McFarland from District 11. (Photo/Choctaw Nation)

To learn more about the Choctaw Labor Day Festival, CLICK.

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About The Author
Author: Darren ThompsonEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Darren Thompson (Lac du Flambeau Ojibwe) is a staff reporter for Native News Online who is based in the Twin Cities of Minnesota. Thompson has reported on political unrest, tribal sovereignty, and Indigenous issues for the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, Indian Country Today, Native News Online, Powwows.com and Unicorn Riot. He has contributed to the New York Times, the Washington Post, and Voice of America on various Indigenous issues in international conversation. He has a bachelor’s degree in Criminology & Law Studies from Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.