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The 2021 Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair, along with the 2020 Cherokee Art Market, will both be held online, according to recent announcements.

The Heard Museum Indian Guild and Fair will take place March 5-7, 2021, and the Cherokee Art Market will be held Dec. 7-21, 2020.

This year’s Heard fair during the first week of March was the last major Native art market to take place in person, and over 650 artists representing more than 100 tribes across the U.S. and Canada participated. 

Next year’s virtual version will include artist interviews, demonstrations, performances and a juried competition. 

For more information, and to register to participate, click here

The Cherokee Art Market was originally scheduled to run Oct. 10-11 at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. It was cancelled at the end of July before organizers decided to pivot online. 

“With many art markets being forced to cancel this year, we wanted to develop a concept that would allow us to continue our annual celebration of Native American art and provide an opportunity for artists to safely sell their works,” Travis Owens, director of Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism said in a press release. “We hope the virtual market will expand the reach and visibility of these artists.”

The virtual market will feature live demonstrations and more opportunities for shoppers to interact with artists.   

 

For updates and more information about the online Cherokee Art Market, visit www.CherokeeArtMarket.com.

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About The Author
Tamara Ikenberg
Author: Tamara IkenbergEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Tamara Ikenberg is a contributing writer to Native News Online. She covers tribes throughout the southwest as well as Native arts, culture and entertainment. She can be reached at [email protected]