fbpx
facebook app symbol  twitter  linkedin  instagram 1
 

The 2021 Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair, along with the 2020 Cherokee Art Market, will both be held online, according to recent announcements.

The Heard Museum Indian Guild and Fair will take place March 5-7, 2021, and the Cherokee Art Market will be held Dec. 7-21, 2020.

This year’s Heard fair during the first week of March was the last major Native art market to take place in person, and over 650 artists representing more than 100 tribes across the U.S. and Canada participated. 

Next year’s virtual version will include artist interviews, demonstrations, performances and a juried competition. 

For more information, and to register to participate, click here

The Cherokee Art Market was originally scheduled to run Oct. 10-11 at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. It was cancelled at the end of July before organizers decided to pivot online. 

“With many art markets being forced to cancel this year, we wanted to develop a concept that would allow us to continue our annual celebration of Native American art and provide an opportunity for artists to safely sell their works,” Travis Owens, director of Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism said in a press release. “We hope the virtual market will expand the reach and visibility of these artists.”

The virtual market will feature live demonstrations and more opportunities for shoppers to interact with artists.   

 

For updates and more information about the online Cherokee Art Market, visit www.CherokeeArtMarket.com.

More Stories Like This

Here's What's Going On In Indian Country, May 17th —May 23rd
Q&A: Diné Designer and Entrepreneur Amy Denet Deal on Being Honored by CNN
Forge Project Awards $150,000 to Native American Artists
Q&A: Ojibwe Designer Lucie Skjefte on New Collaboration with Minnetonka Footwear
Q&A: Kevin Sur (Kānaka Maoli), Co-Host of KEXP’s ‘Sounds of Survivance'

These stories must be heard.

This May, we are highlighting our coverage of Indian boarding schools and their generational impact on Native families and Native communities. Giving survivors of boarding schools and their descendants the opportunity to share their stories is an important step toward healing — not just because they are speaking, but because they are being heard. Their stories must be heard. Help our efforts to make sure Native stories and Native voices are heard in 2024. Please consider a recurring donation to help fund our ongoing coverage of Indian boarding schools. Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous-centered journalism. Thank you.

About The Author
Tamara Ikenberg
Author: Tamara IkenbergEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Tamara Ikenberg is a contributing writer to Native News Online. She covers tribes throughout the southwest as well as Native arts, culture and entertainment. She can be reached at [email protected].