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PHOENIX, Ariz. — Due to the coronavirus pandemic, nearly 30 percent of museums in the United States remain closed and most do not have plans to reopen in the near-term, according to a new study conducted by the Association of American Museums (AAM). Of the 850 museums that participated in the survey, 98 percent closed to the public last year and museums that have opened are experiencing 35 percent of normal attendance. 

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This weekend and next week, Indian Country will be awash with awesome events, from spectacular online powwows, to poignant intergenerational art shows, to events leading up to Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women’s Day on Wednesday, May 5.

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PBS KIDS' Molly of Denali, the first U.S. nationally distributed children’s series with an Alaska Native lead, continues its groundbreaking work in childhood development with the release of the first-ever study that connects children’s understanding of informational text to digital media. 

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SANTA FE, N.M. — The Southwestern Association for Indian Arts (SWAIA) announced on Friday that the 99th Santa Fe Indian Market will be held in-person—and online—on Saturday, August 21, and Sunday, August 22, 2021. 

Raven Halfmoon (Caddo Nation) and Paul Rowley (Tlingit and Haida tribes of Alaska). (Tinworksart.org)
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Tinworks Art named the recipients of its 2021 Tinworks Artists Grant on Saturday, with two Indigenous grant winners among them. 

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Learning to balance between following dreams and meeting family expectations is a challenge for many young people, especially Native/Indigenous women. These stories are all too familiar and emerging female directors, writers and actresses are determined to make these perspectives known and explored.

Spirit Rangers
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For decades, Native youth have had to grow up with limited representation in the media and in the entertainment industry. Hollywood portrayals of Native people have ranged from villains who attack white settlers in Westerns, to helpful but silent friends who aid the story’s main heroes, many of which perpetuate harmful stereotypes. However, audiences are witnessing a beautiful movement towards more diverse and equitable programming, especially for younger generations. Native people are transitioning to studio positions and leading creative development teams to show off their storytelling abilities, while reaching wider audiences with various streaming platforms along the way.

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PHOENIX, Ariz. — The world renowned Heard Museum Guild hosted its 63rd annual Indian Fair & Market over the weekend, featuring Native American art from more than 325 artists with more than 80 tribal affiliations from Alaska to Maine. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, this year’s event was dubbed as a hybrid fair with the majority of activities (such as the art market, performances and artist interviews) held virtually, and some artists showcasing their work live in the museum shop.

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HALEIWA, Hawaii — Societies have been shaped through their legends and myths, which reflect worldviews, define human relations and teach life-long lessons. As a result of colonization, many Indigenous stories from all over the world were suppressed and consequently lost to history. But some traditional storytellers are utilizing contemporary techniques, such as filmmaking, to help secure these oral histories and ensure the survival of their messages. 

Michael Greyeyes
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Native people in cinema have been categorized into stereotypical and inconsequential roles, which has created a gap in Native-centric films that allow for any worthwhile character development. Some Native filmmakers are working to break away from historical settings and cultivate more fleshed out storylines for contemporary Native protagonists. For Sundance Institute alum, writer and director Lyle Mitchell Corbine Jr. (Shinaab), it was a necessity to show audiences the inner workings of Native minds, even the more questionable characters.