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TAHLEQUAH, Okla. — Artwork is now being accepted for the 26th annual Cherokee Homecoming Art Show & Sale, which is being held in coordination with the 69th annual Cherokee National Holiday, scheduled for Aug. 27 – Sept. 25 at the Cherokee National Research Center. Due to continued concerns about the Covid-19 pandemic, the show is being offered both virtually and in person.

All Cherokee artists are eligible to submit entries for the juried art show. It  is open to citizens of Cherokee Nation, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and United Keetoowah Band. Artists of distinction, including Cherokee National Treasures, UKB Tradition Keepers and EBCI Beloved Persons, are exempt from jury but must complete the online entry process by the July 23 deadline to participate.

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Selected artists will compete for more than $15,000 in two divisions: traditional and contemporary. The traditional division is defined as “arts customary to Cherokee people before European contact” and consists of three categories: basketry, pottery and traditional arts. The contemporary division is defined as “arts arising among the Cherokee after European contact” and consists of seven categories: paintings, sculpture, pottery, basketry, beadwork, jewelry and textiles.

Winning work will be announced Aug. 27 at 6 p.m. on the website, followed by the in-person, public opening on Aug. 28 at the Cherokee National Research Center, located in Cherokee Springs Plaza.

For additional information or to register and submit art, please visit Cherokee Homecoming Art Show & Sale | Visit Cherokee Nation.

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