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The Indian Pueblo Cultural Center (IPCC) in Albuquerque, New Mexico celebrates Pueblo culture in a unique way during the holiday season: through gingerbread. 

In IPCC’s annual Pueblo Gingerbread House Contest this December, participants submitted edible creations representing traditional Pueblo villages, houses, communities, churches, historic dwellings and more. Cash prizes were awarded to kids and adults alike, from age 5 and up, in the amounts of $50 - $500.

“This contest allows us to celebrate the season with an age-old tradition of creating a gingerbread house while also continuing to educate and showcase the Pueblo culture through architecture and Pueblo life,” said IPCC Cultural Arts & Programs Director Alicia Ortiz in a press release.

Children as young as five years old took part in the competition, which was judged by honorary VIP judges Pueblo Santa and Mrs. Claus. Nearly 300 IPCC guests voted for the Peoples’ Choice awards, given to the crowd favorite for each age group.

IPCC, founded in 1976 by the 19 Pueblo tribes of New Mexico, has hosted its gingerbread competition for more than 10 years. Through its museum and cultural center, IPCC preserves and perpetuates Pueblo culture by sharing dance, Native languages, Native cuisine, and Native jewelry and art with visitors. 

The annual gingerbread event was canceled last year due to COVID-19, making this years event extra sweet.

View the virtual gallery with entries and winners here.

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About The Author
Author: Kelsey TurnerEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Kelsey Turner is a contributing writer for Native News Online and a graduate student at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University.