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This month, we’re compiling questions that our readers are asking us about Indian Boarding Schools and offering answers as reported by our team. 

Today’s reader question about Indian Boarding Schools comes from Linda B., who asked us: 

Are the current-day facilities — such as St. Joseph’s Indian School in South Dakota — better or in the same category of the federally funded ones mentioned in the article?

Our reporter Jenna Kunze, who has written nearly half of our 100-plus stories about Indian Boarding Schools, provides this answer: 

Currently, the federal Bureau of Indian Education funds or operates 183 schools across the United States—including four off-reservation boarding schools—though the schools do not function as they once did. 

“The most important thing to understand right now is that it is not the express purpose of the United States federal government to operate the schools to forcibly assimilate kids,” Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs Bryan Newland said last month, adding that most of the schools funded by the Bureau of Indian Affairs are operated directly by tribes. “So the difference is at the core of the school's mission, which is to empower Indian kids in their communities… and not to forcibly assimilate kids and not to take them from their families without their consent.”

St. Joseph’s Indian School, formerly known as Chamberlain Indian School, was an off-reservation boarding school funded by the federal government from 1898 to 1909. It was later sold to the Catholic Church, who still run the facility as a boarding school for Native American youth today. The school made headlines in 2016 when officials sent out disparaging fundraising letters meant to appear as though they were authored by children.

If you have a question about Indian Boarding Schools, please submit them to [email protected] or use the online form that can be found at the bottom of stories such as this one. Want to help support our continued reporting on this important topic?  Become a recurring donor for $5 or $10 a month, or make a one-time donation.  

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12 years of Native News

This month, we celebrate our 12th year of delivering Native News to readers throughout Indian Country and beyond. For the past dozen years, we’ve covered the most important news stories that are usually overlooked by other media. From the protests at Standing Rock and the rise of the American Indian Movement (AIM), to the ongoing epidemic of Murdered and Missing Indigenous People (MMIP) and the past-due reckoning related to assimilation, cultural genocide and Indian Boarding Schools.

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About The Author
Jenna Kunze
Author: Jenna KunzeEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Staff Writer
Jenna Kunze is a staff reporter covering Indian health, the environment and breaking news for Native News Online. She is also the publication's lead reporter on stories related to Indian boarding schools and repatriation. Her bylines have appeared in The Arctic Sounder, High Country News, Indian Country Today, Tribal Business News, Smithsonian Magazine, Elle and Anchorage Daily News. Kunze is based in New York.