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During the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, tribal officials report that there is typically an upsurge in cases after tribal citizens attend holiday gatherings. This holiday season, there is greater apprehension because of the widely reported Omicron variant that is spreading rapidly away from reservations, particularly in larger metropolitan areas

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Guest Opinion. In 1492, Christopher Columbus set out, on behalf of the Spanish government, to find a nautical eastern passage to Asia. Much to the surprise of Spain and all of the European powers, Columbus instead found a land mass that had been inhabited since time immemorial. This was one of the first recorded contacts between the European and Tribal nations. Under the diplomatic norms of the 15th century, Columbus and Spain could have sought to establish diplomatic ties between the nations, which might have led to trade opportunities between the Tribes and Europe. However, the European powers had other ideas. Avoiding any pretense of diplomacy, the Catholic Church sought to legally justify settlement of the land mass, which they would later call “America.” 

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When Lydia Jennings finally finished her doctoral program in soil microbiology, a lockdown amid the COVID-19 pandemic made celebrating difficult.

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The Navajo Nation reported on Saturday 100 new COVID-19 cases, which brings the total number of coronavirus cases on the nation’s largest Indian reservation to 40,019. The total includes all COVID-19 cases on the Navajo Nation since March 17, 2020 when the tribe began tracking COVID cases.

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Indigenous scholars at the University of Arizona Health Sciences are improving research opportunities by crafting polices on the collection and use of data.

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Earlier this month, Native News Online talked with Larry Curley (Navajo), the executive director of the National Indian Council on Aging. He spoke with us about how his agency is striving to meet the needs of older Native Americans across Indian Country. We’re publishing our Q & A with Curley here. The discussion has been edited for content and clarity.

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In service of World AIDS Day Dec. 1— a date commemorating 40 years and more than 700,000 deaths since the HIV epidemic first touched the United States—the Kent County Health Department will offer free walk-in testing in Grand Rapids, Mich.

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For the population that has borne the brunt of COVID-19--Indigenous Peoples--Indian Health Services (IHS) this month announced a $46.4 million investment into behavioral health programming across Indian Country.

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White Mountain Apache Tribe, like much of the U.S. right now, is seeing a surge in COVID-19 cases. At the time of this writing, the tribe has 353 new COVID-19 cases and are in their second weekend of a lockdown. 

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University of Arizona Health Sciences-led study uncovered disparities in breast cancer treatments that may lead to poorer health outcomes in Indigenous women, who currently have the worst breast cancer survival outcomes of any racial group in the U.S.