TAHLEQUAH, Okla. — In the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic, flu vaccinations are being encouraged by health experts. The Cherokee Nation is making the process easier this year by offering free flu vaccinations through the month of December to prepare for the upcoming flu season. 

Flu season typically runs between September and March, but each year it peaks during different months. This year, due to the pandemic, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is encouraging early flu shots. 

From Oct. 5 through Dec. 16, anyone ages 6 months or older can get a flu vaccine for free. 

Tribal health officials have dozens of vaccination clinics scheduled in October, November and December at various community buildings, local businesses, churches, town halls and health centers throughout the tribe’s 14-county reservation in northeastern Oklahoma.

“The viruses that cause influenza and COVID will both be spreading through our communities this fall and winter and you can become infected with both,” said Cherokee Nation Health Services Executive Medical Director Dr. Roger Montgomery. “Getting a flu shot won’t prevent COVID infection but it will reduce your chance of getting influenza. Please take advantage of the proven protection that comes from getting a flu shot.”

For the flu vaccination schedule, visit https://health.cherokee.org/community-flu-clinics/. Vaccination clinic dates and locations are subject to change.

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Author: Native News Online Staff