fbpx
 

By now, most are feeling the onset of cabin fever, but luckily people and organizations are getting creative and figuring out ways to stay social. As reported earlier this week by Native News Online, those looking to link up with people from across the map are invited to join the Association on American Indian Affairs’ live stream today. The #SHAREHEALING stream, which welcomes all, encourages everyone to “come together—from our homes or a quiet place with physical distance from others—to share 20 minutes in prayer, good thoughts and unity of spirit.”

For those wanting to tune in, here are the times by region: 5 p.m. Eastern, 4 p.m. Mountain, 3 p.m. Central, 2 p.m. Pacific, 1 p.m. Alaska and 11 a.m. Hawaii time.

The association is also asking people to reach out to them online during these challenging times. A recent statement asked their followers to: “Please share, if it is appropriate, what you are doing to pray, meditate, or share healing thoughts on social media by posting with #ShareHealing and by tagging us on [on social media] … Let us join together to #ShareHealing [and] to send thoughts of healing and health during this uneasy and fearful time.”

For information on how to view #SHAREHEALING, follow them on Facebook, here. Follow the A.A.I.A. online at: Facebook: @AssociationAmericanIndianAffairs

Twitter: @IndianAffairs

Instagram: @AssocIndianAffairs

More Stories Like This

Tribal Business News Round Up: Sept. 26
A Year Later, Myron Dewey’s Family Waits for Justice
Two National Native American Organizations to Address International Trade for Indian Country at World Trade Organization Forum in Geneva
Native News Weekly (September 25, 2022): D.C. Briefs
Rep. Mary Sattler Peltola Hits the Ground Running: Her First Bill Introduced Clears Committee Two Days Later

Do you appreciate a Native perspective on the news? 

For the past decade-plus, we’ve covered the important Indigenous stories that are often overlooked by other media. From the protests at Standing Rock and the toppling of colonizer statues during the racial equity protests, to the ongoing epidemic of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW) and the past-due reckoning related to assimilation, cultural genocide and Indian Boarding Schools, we have been there to provide a Native perspective and elevate Native voices.

Our news is free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts. Any contribution — big or small — helps us remain a force for change in Indian Country and continue telling the stories that are so often ignored, erased or overlooked.  Most often, our donors make a one-time gift of $20 or more, while many choose to make a recurring monthly donation of $5 or $10.  Whatever you can do, it helps fund our Indigenous-led newsroom and our ability to cover Native news. 

Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Author: Rich TupicaEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.