fbpx
 

By now, most are feeling the onset of cabin fever, but luckily people and organizations are getting creative and figuring out ways to stay social. As reported earlier this week by Native News Online, those looking to link up with people from across the map are invited to join the Association on American Indian Affairs’ live stream today. The #SHAREHEALING stream, which welcomes all, encourages everyone to “come together—from our homes or a quiet place with physical distance from others—to share 20 minutes in prayer, good thoughts and unity of spirit.”

For those wanting to tune in, here are the times by region: 5 p.m. Eastern, 4 p.m. Mountain, 3 p.m. Central, 2 p.m. Pacific, 1 p.m. Alaska and 11 a.m. Hawaii time.

The association is also asking people to reach out to them online during these challenging times. A recent statement asked their followers to: “Please share, if it is appropriate, what you are doing to pray, meditate, or share healing thoughts on social media by posting with #ShareHealing and by tagging us on [on social media] … Let us join together to #ShareHealing [and] to send thoughts of healing and health during this uneasy and fearful time.”

For information on how to view #SHAREHEALING, follow them on Facebook, here. Follow the A.A.I.A. online at: Facebook: @AssociationAmericanIndianAffairs

Twitter: @IndianAffairs

Instagram: @AssocIndianAffairs

More Stories Like This

Kamala Harris, Deb Haaland Call On Congress to Pass Indigenous Voting Rights Legislation
Crow Tribe Files Lawsuit Against BIA Officer for Use of Excessive Force
PHOTOS: Red Road to DC Totem Pole Makes Stop at Michigan's Straits of Mackinac
Red Lake Police Officer Killed While on Duty
Lawsuit Over Oakland Community Sweat Lodge Leads to Pushback From Native Elders Group

Native Perspective.  Native Voices.  Native News. 

We launched Native News Online because the mainstream media often overlooks news that is important is Native people. We believe that everyone in Indian Country deserves equal access to news and commentary pertaining to them, their relatives and their communities. That's why the story you’ve just finished was free — and we want to keep it that way, for all readers.  We hope you'll consider making a donation to support our efforts so that we can continue publishing more stories that make a difference to Native people, whether they live on or off the reservation. Your donation will help us keep producing quality journalism and elevating Indigenous voices. Any contribution of any amount — big or small — gives us a better, stronger future and allows us to remain a force for change. Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you.

About The Author
Author: Rich Tupica