fbpx
 

You will lose the hour you gained last fall on Sunday, March 13, 2022 at 2:00 a.m. because it is time to “spring forward” with daylight saving time. The switch to daylight savings time applies to most of the Unites States. 

Most states comply with daylight saving time change. However, the state of Arizona does not, except on the Navajo Indian Reservation where a large portion of it is located. The only other state in the country that does not comply with daylight saving time is Hawaii.

Want more Native News? Get the free daily newsletter today.

With the advent of technology, such as computers, smart phones, and tablets, many clocks will self-adjust to daylight saving time at 2:00 a.m. However, other clocks and watches will still need to be changed.

While some people don’t like the change in time twice per year,  daylight saving time gives the United States about 7.5 months of daylight saving time and 4.5 months of standard time.

Fire departments across the United States remind us this is a great time to change batteries in our smoke detectors, which should be tested monthly.

The time will fall back to standard time at 2:00 a.m., November 6, 2022 when you can regain the hour of sleep you lose overnight.

More Stories Like This

Interior Secretary Deb Haaland Visits the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site
History Was Made as Nicole Aunapu Mann Became the First Native American Woman Launched into Space
Tribal Business News Round Up: Oct. 4
Hurricane Ian Slams Southwest Florida, But Mostly Spares Reservations
Department of the Interior Announces South Dakota Third Stop on Road to Healing Tour

Do you appreciate a Native perspective on the news? 

For the past decade-plus, we’ve covered the important Indigenous stories that are often overlooked by other media. From the protests at Standing Rock and the toppling of colonizer statues during the racial equity protests, to the ongoing epidemic of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW) and the past-due reckoning related to assimilation, cultural genocide and Indian Boarding Schools, we have been there to provide a Native perspective and elevate Native voices.

Our news is free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts. Any contribution — big or small — helps us remain a force for change in Indian Country and continue telling the stories that are so often ignored, erased or overlooked.  Most often, our donors make a one-time gift of $20 or more, while many choose to make a recurring monthly donation of $5 or $10.  Whatever you can do, it helps fund our Indigenous-led newsroom and our ability to cover Native news. 

Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Native News Online is one of the most-read publications covering Indian Country and the news that matters to American Indians, Alaska Natives and other Indigenous people. Reach out to us at [email protected]