fbpx
 

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. — On Sunday, the Navajo Department of Health, in coordination with the Navajo Epidemiology Center and the Navajo Area Indian Health Service, reported 57 new cases of COVID-19 for the Navajo Nation and three more deaths.

The total number of deaths has reached 311 as of Sunday. Reports from 11 health care facilities indicate that approximately 3,158 individuals have recovered from COVID-19, with one health care facility report still pending. 44,207 people have been tested for COVID-19. The total number of positive COVID-19 cases for the Navajo Nation has reached 6,611.

Navajo Nation cases by Service Unit:

  • Chinle Service Unit: 1,725
  • Crownpoint Service Unit: 612
  • Ft. Defiance Service Unit: 418
  • Gallup Service Unit: 1,114
  • Kayenta Service Unit: 960
  • Shiprock Service Unit: 1,090
  • Tuba City Service Unit: 543
  • Winslow Service Unit: 141

* Eight residences are not specific enough to place them accurately in a Service Unit

On Sunday, the Arizona Department of Health Services reported 1,233 new cases of COVID-19 for the entire state since Saturday, and more increases in hospitalizations, ICU bed occupancy, and ventilator usage due to the community spread of the virus.

"With the state of Arizona relaxing its precautions and allowing its stay-at-home order to expire, the highly-populated areas are seeing dramatic increases. I cannot stress enough to our Navajo people the importance of staying home as much as possible. It only takes a few people traveling to Phoenix or other hotspots, to catch the virus and start another wave of new cases here on the Navajo Nation. Let’s remember that this virus started elsewhere and made its way into the Navajo Nation — people move the virus. If we stay at home, we isolate the virus. Keep wearing your masks – masks save lives,” Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez said.

On Tuesday at 10:00 a.m. (MDT), President Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer will host another online town hall to provide the latest COVID-19 updates. There will also be updates provided by the U.S. Census office regarding the 2020 Census Count on the Navajo Nation.

_________________________________________________________________

To Donate to the Navajo Nation

The official webpage for donations to the Navajo Nation, which has further details on how to support  the Nation’s Dikos Ntsaaígíí-19 (COVID-19) efforts is:  http://www.nndoh.org/donate.html.

_________________________________________________________________

For More Information

For more information including reports, helpful prevention tips, and more resources, please visit the Navajo Department of Health’s COVID-19 website at http://www.ndoh.navajo-nsn.gov/COVID-19. To contact the main Navajo Health Command Operations Center, please call (928) 871-7014.

For up to date information on impact the coronavirus pandemic is having in the United States and around the world go to: https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/country/us/?fbclid=IwAR1vxfcHfMBnmTFm6hBICQcdbV5aRnMimeP3hVYHdlxJtFWdKF80VV8iHgE

For up-to-date information about COVID-19, Native News Online encourages you to go to Indian Health Service’s COVID-19 webpage and review CDC’s COVID-19

More Stories Like This

Tribes in Oklahoma Take to Social Media to Criticize Oklahoma Governor Stitt’s MLK Jr. Comments
Native News Weekly (January 16, 2022): D.C. Briefs
Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes to Host Annual "Would Jesus Eat Frybread?" Conference
Navajo Nation President Addresses Arizona State Legislature on Issues Facing Navajo People
Hundreds Gather for Clyde Bellecourt’s Funeral Services in Minneapolis

The truth about Indian Boarding Schools

This month, we’re asking our readers to help us raise $10,000 to fund our year-long journalism initiative called “The Indian Boarding School Project: A Dark Chapter in History.”  Our mission is to shine a light on the dark era of forced assimilation of native American children by the U.S. government and churches.  You’ll be able to read stories each week and join us for Livestream events to understand what the Indian Boarding School era has meant to Native Americans — and what it still means today.

This news will be provided free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts.  Any contribution of any amount — big or small — gives us a better, stronger future and allows us to remain a force for change. Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.