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MACKINAW CITY, Mich. —  The historic cross country "Red Road to DC" totem pole journey from the Lummi Nation in Washington state made a stop in Mackinaw City, Mich. on Tuesday morning before it arrives in Washington, D.C. where it will be greeted by Interior Secretary Deb Haaland on Thursday.

The Tuesday stop was hosted by the Bay Mills Indian Community at the Straits of Mackinac near the Mackinac Bridge, which connect Michigan's two peninsulas. 

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Here are photographs of the Mackinaw City, Mich. stop.

The totem rode across the country on a flatbed trailer. (Photo/Levi Rickert)

 

The eagle represents the messenger of the Creator. (Photo/Levi Rickert)

 

Doug James (Lummi Nation) of the House of Tears Carvers and entourage will be in Washington, D.C. on Thursday. (Photo/Levi Rickert)

 

The entry to the Mackinac Bridge from Michigan's Lower Peninsular is in background. (Photo/Levi Rickert)

 

Bay Mills Indian Community Chairperson Whitney Gravelle greets well wishers. (Photo/Levi Rickert)

 

The top of the totem honors Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW). (Photo/Levi Rickert)

 

One part of the totem pole represents the fight to protect salmon and other living creatures.. (Photo/Levi Rickert)

 

Sault Ste. Marie Chairperson Aaron Payment and Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians Tribal Chairperson:Regina Gasco-Bentley. (Photo/Levi Rickert)

 

 

 

 

 

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About The Author
Levi Rickert
Author: Levi RickertEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Levi Rickert (Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation) is the founder, publisher and editor of Native News Online. Rickert was awarded Best Column 2021 Native Media Award for the print/online category by the Native American Journalists Association. He serves on the advisory board of the Multicultural Media Correspondents Association. He can be reached at [email protected]