fbpx
 

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. — The Navajo Department of, in coordination with the Navajo Epidemiology Center and the Navajo Area Indian Health Service, on Thursday reported the Navajo Nation has reached 1,400 deaths as the result of Covid-19.

The Navajo Nation first began reporting its Covid-19 statistics on March 17, 2020.

Want more Native News? Get the free daily newsletter today.

The 1,400-death toll represents the highest among other American Indian tribes throughout Indian Country.

While the death rate has slowed significantly because of the high percentage of Navajo citizens who have received the Covid-19 vaccine, Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez still encourages Navajo Nation citizens to get vaccinated if they have received it yet. He is also encouraging Navajo citizens who have a compromised immune system to get the Covid-19 booster shots that are now being administered on the Navajo Nation.

“In order to see a consistent reduction in new Covid-19 cases, we need more of our Navajo Nation residents to get fully vaccinated as soon as possible. Masks work and the vaccines are highly effective in pushing back on Covid-19 and the Delta variant. Please continue to take precautions and minimize travel and in-person social and family gatherings,” President Nez said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced that the goal is begin administering Covid-19 booster shots in the fall for individuals who previously received the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, which is subject to authorization by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and recommendation by the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

For more information, including helpful prevention tips, and resources to help stop the spread of Covid-19, visit the Navajo Department of Health's Covid-19 website: http://www.ndoh.navajo-nsn.gov/Covid-19. For Covid-19 related questions and information, call (928) 871-7014.

More Stories Like This

Tribally-Owned Golf Course Awarded National Golf Course of the Year
Chewing Tobacco with a Disparaging Name Wants to be “More Inclusive,” Now Known As “America’s Best Chew”
Native News Weekly (January 23, 2022): D.C. Briefs
NCAI's 2022 Executive Council Winter Session to be Virtual Again This Year
US Supreme Court Will Not Consider Overturning McGirt Decision; Will Rule on Scope of the Landmark Ruling

The truth about Indian Boarding Schools

This month, we’re asking our readers to help us raise $10,000 to fund our year-long journalism initiative called “The Indian Boarding School Project: A Dark Chapter in History.”  Our mission is to shine a light on the dark era of forced assimilation of native American children by the U.S. government and churches.  You’ll be able to read stories each week and join us for Livestream events to understand what the Indian Boarding School era has meant to Native Americans — and what it still means today.

This news will be provided free for everyone to read, but it is not free to produce. That’s why we’re asking you to make a donation this month to help support our efforts.  Any contribution of any amount — big or small — gives us a better, stronger future and allows us to remain a force for change. Donate to Native News Online today and support independent Indigenous journalism. Thank you. 

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.