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WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. — The Navajo Department of, in coordination with the Navajo Epidemiology Center and the Navajo Area Indian Health Service, on Thursday reported the Navajo Nation has reached 1,400 deaths as the result of Covid-19.

The Navajo Nation first began reporting its Covid-19 statistics on March 17, 2020.

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The 1,400-death toll represents the highest among other American Indian tribes throughout Indian Country.

While the death rate has slowed significantly because of the high percentage of Navajo citizens who have received the Covid-19 vaccine, Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez still encourages Navajo Nation citizens to get vaccinated if they have received it yet. He is also encouraging Navajo citizens who have a compromised immune system to get the Covid-19 booster shots that are now being administered on the Navajo Nation.

“In order to see a consistent reduction in new Covid-19 cases, we need more of our Navajo Nation residents to get fully vaccinated as soon as possible. Masks work and the vaccines are highly effective in pushing back on Covid-19 and the Delta variant. Please continue to take precautions and minimize travel and in-person social and family gatherings,” President Nez said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced that the goal is begin administering Covid-19 booster shots in the fall for individuals who previously received the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, which is subject to authorization by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and recommendation by the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

For more information, including helpful prevention tips, and resources to help stop the spread of Covid-19, visit the Navajo Department of Health's Covid-19 website: http://www.ndoh.navajo-nsn.gov/Covid-19. For Covid-19 related questions and information, call (928) 871-7014.

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