fbpx
facebook app symbol  twitter  linkedin  instagram 1
 
A group of five federally recognized tribes have joined a federal lawsuit that aims to block Alaska Native Corporations from receiving CARES Funding (Wikipedia Commons Photo

WASHINGTON — Five federally recognized tribes, including the country’s largest tribal nation, have joined a federal lawsuit to block the Treasury Dept. from distributing federal relief funds to Alaska Native Corporations, according to a court filing yesterday.  

The five tribes represent nearly 330,000 tribal citizens from the states of Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Washington, and California. They joined six other tribes that filed the initial lawsuit last week and, on Monday morning, followed it by filing for a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction.   

The tribes joining the lawsuit include the Quinault Indian Nation (Wash.), the Pueblo of Picuris (N.M.), the Elk Valley Rancheria (Calif.), the San Carlos Apache Tribe (Ariz.) and the Navajo Nation (multiple states). With 309,000 tribal members, Navajo Nation is the country’s largest American Indian tribe.    

In an amended filing yesterday with the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, the tribes asked the court to exclude Alaska Native regional corporations and Alaska Native village corporations from allocating and distributing any of the  more $8 billion available to tribes under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. The lawsuit asks that the court direct Secretary Treasury Steven Mnuchin to disburse the funds only to federally recognized Tribal governments no later than April 26.  

The tribes argue that allocating funds to Alaska corporations would reduce aid available to federally recognized tribal governments, which desperately need the funding to provide essential governmental services and to safeguard the public health and welfare in their communities. 

A hearing on the motion has been set for the afternoon of Thursday, April 23, according to court records.  

In a separate court filing, a group of 12 regional and national organizations including the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) asked the court for permission to file a brief in support of the tribes’ motion for a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction.  

 

More Stories Like This

Read Former President Trump's Acceptance Speech
Chief Standing Bear Courage Prize Committee Announces U.S. District Court Judge Diane Humetewa as 2024 Prize Recipient
Vice President Kamala Harris Speaks in Michigan about Women's Rights
Trump’s New Running Mate, J.D. Vance, Has History of Anti-Indigenous Beliefs
Rep. Lauren Boebert Thinks She Should be the Next Interior Secretary If Trump is Elected

Join us in observing 100 years of Native American citizenship. On June 2, 1924, President Calvin Coolidge signed the Indian Citizenship Act, granting Native Americans US citizenship, a pivotal moment in their quest for equality. This year marks its centennial, inspiring our special project, "Heritage Unbound: Native American Citizenship at 100," observing their journey with stories of resilience, struggle, and triumph. Your donations fuel initiatives like these, ensuring our coverage and projects honoring Native American heritage thrive. Your donations fuel initiatives like these, ensuring our coverage and projects honoring Native American heritage thrive.

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Native News Online is one of the most-read publications covering Indian Country and the news that matters to American Indians, Alaska Natives and other Indigenous people. Reach out to us at [email protected].