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WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. — As of Tuesday, the Navajo Area Indian Health Service (IHS) reported that 135,685 total vaccine doses have been received, 116,611 administered, which represents nearly 86-percent so far. 28,961 individuals have received a first and second dose of the vaccines.

On Tuesday, the Navajo Department of Health, in coordination with the Navajo Epidemiology Center and the Navajo Area Indian Health Service, reported 20 new Covid-19 positive cases for the Navajo Nation and seven more deaths. The total number of deaths is now 1,152 as of Tuesday. Reports indicate that 16,009 individuals have recovered from Covid-19, and 242,933 Covid-19 tests have been administered. The total number of positive Covid-19 cases is now 29,576, including five delayed reported cases.

Navajo Nation Covid-19 positive cases by Service Unit:

  • Chinle Service Unit: 5,445
  • Crownpoint Service Unit: 2,849
  • Ft. Defiance Service Unit: 3,496
  • Gallup Service Unit: 4,675
  • Kayenta Service Unit: 2,628
  • Shiprock Service Unit: 4,995
  • Tuba City Service Unit: 3,586
  • Winslow Service Unit: 1,883

* 19 residences with Covid-19 positive cases are not specific enough to place them accurately in a Service Unit.

On Tuesday, the state of Arizona reported 1,184 new cases, Utah reported 716, and New Mexico reported 314 new cases. 

“There’s no doubt in my mind that we will overcome this Covid-19 pandemic, but how soon we do that depends on us as individuals. Every day, we make decisions that either keep us safe and healthy or put us at greater risk of this virus. It’s up to us as individuals to protect ourselves and our loved ones. Our public health experts have learned a lot about this virus over the last year, but we don’t know as much about the new variants that are spreading from person to person. When we travel off the Navajo Nation or hold in-person gatherings, we put ourselves at much greater risk of catching or spreading Covid-19. Our health care workers are doing outstanding work in administering the vaccines, but we all have to do our part. Stay home as much as possible, wear a mask or two in public and near others, avoid large gatherings or crowds, practice social distancing, and wash your hands often,” said Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez.

Health care facilities across the Navajo Nation continue to administer Covid-19 vaccines during drive-thru events or by appointment. If you would like to receive the vaccine, please contact your health care provider for more information for your Service Unit.

On Thursday, Feb. 25 at 10:00 a.m. (MST), the Nez-Lizer Administration will host an online town hall on the Nez-Lizer Facebook page and YouTube channel to provide more Covid-19 updates.

For more information, including helpful prevention tips, and resources to help stop the spread of Covid-19, visit the Navajo Department of Health's Covid-19 website: http://www.ndoh.navajo-nsn.gov/Covid-19. For Covid-19 related questions and information, call (928) 871-7014. 

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Levi Rickert
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