fbpx
facebook app symbol  twitter  linkedin  instagram 1
 

In honor of National Child Abuse Prevention Month, on Tuesday, April 9, the National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA) is hosting a demonstration of support for Native children by joining in a National Day of Prayer for Native children.

In honor of National Child Abuse Prevention Month, on Tuesday, April 9, the National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA) is hosting a demonstration of support for Native children by joining in a National Day of Prayer for Native children.

This National Day of Prayer coincides with the NICWA’s 42nd Annual Protecting Our Children Conference in Seattle. The conference is the premiere national event addressing tribal child welfare and the well-being of Native children.

Never miss Indian Country’s biggest stories and breaking news. Sign up to get our reporting sent straight to your inbox every weekday morning. 

NCIWA is encouraging advocates for children to join in the National Day of Prayer by hosting a community event to demonstrate support for all Native children. 

Over the month of April, NICWA will share resources promoting child safety as a collective community responsibility, with examples of reorienting tribal child welfare systems to stop the intergenerational transmission of trauma and support healing.

“Our communities are a protective factor— what we call a natural safety net,” said NICWA Executive Director Sarah Kastelic. “As Native people, our extended families and connection to community and culture larger than ourselves are central elements of our mental health and well-being. Our communities are essential to preventing child abuse and neglect.”

To learn more about the Protecting Our Children Conference, visit https://www.nicwa.org/conference/.

 

More Stories Like This

Navajo President Nygren Testifies Before House Natural Resources Committee in Support of Water Bills
US Senate to Hear Arguments for Establishing a Commission on Federal Indian Boarding School Policies
Santa Ynez Chumash Motorcycle Group Shines Light on MMIWR Crisis
Harris Secures Enough Delegates to Become the Democratic Presumptive Presidential Nominee
Democrats’ Counter-Convention focuses on Trump and Vance’s Project 2025 Plan to Ban Abortion Nationwide

Join us in observing 100 years of Native American citizenship. On June 2, 1924, President Calvin Coolidge signed the Indian Citizenship Act, granting Native Americans US citizenship, a pivotal moment in their quest for equality. This year marks its centennial, inspiring our special project, "Heritage Unbound: Native American Citizenship at 100," observing their journey with stories of resilience, struggle, and triumph. Your donations fuel initiatives like these, ensuring our coverage and projects honoring Native American heritage thrive. Your donations fuel initiatives like these, ensuring our coverage and projects honoring Native American heritage thrive.

About The Author
Native News Online Staff
Author: Native News Online StaffEmail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Native News Online is one of the most-read publications covering Indian Country and the news that matters to American Indians, Alaska Natives and other Indigenous people. Reach out to us at [email protected].