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WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. — The Navajo Nation set a goal of administering 100,000 Covid-19 vaccine doses by the end of February. The goal was met on Thursday, Feb. 18.

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer announced that the Navajo Area Indian Health Service has administered 101,332 doses of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines on the Navajo Nation as of Thursday.

“COVID-19 vaccine doses are going into the arms of our people at a very high rate here on the Navajo Nation. The confidence level in the vaccines is very high among our Navajo people and that’s evident by the long lines of people wanting to receive the vaccine that we see at each vaccination site,” Nez said.

He cites the coordination between the Navajo Area Indian Health Service (IHS),  Navajo Department of Health, tribal health organizations, and all of the health care workers.

“I thank all of our Navajo people who are getting vaccinated to help protect themselves and others. If you would like to receive the vaccine, please contact your health care service unit and schedule an appointment or attend one of the drive-thru vaccination events,” Nez said.

On Thursday, Navajo Area IHS reported that 133,765 total vaccine doses have been received, 101,332 administered, which represents 76 percent so far. 23,729 individuals have received a first and second dose of the vaccines.

Health care facilities across the Navajo Nation continue to administer COVID-19 vaccines during drive-thru events or by appointment. If you would like to receive the vaccine, please contact your health care provider for more information for your Service Unit.

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